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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Thursday 

Norway's government denies Russian accusations, PST says more than one person may have been involved in Oslo shootings, flight cancellations and other headlines from Norway on Thursday.

Pictured is Preistkoeln.
Read about PST saying that more than one person may have been involved in shootings in Oslo, Norway saying it's violated a treaty and more in today's roundup. Pictured is Priestkolen. Read about PST saying that more than one person may have been involved in shootings in Oslo, Norway saying it's violated a treaty and more in today's roundup. Pictured is Priestkolen.

PST lowers threat level but says more than one person may have been involved in Oslo shootings

Norway’s domestic intelligence and counter-terrorism service, PST, has said that more than one person may have been in the mass shootings in Oslo last week than the one person who has been arrested. 

“There are several people we consider to be involved in it,” Roger Berg, acting head of PST, told newswire NTB. 

“The investigation will reveal if more people were involved in the actual action on Saturday night. PST says that there may be several people in the network around him who may be important for future terrorist acts,” Berg added. 

PST also lowered the threat level to the second-highest level and said the threat situation is now less clear. 

Norway says it is not violating Svalbard treaty

Norway has said it hasn’t breached a century-old treaty covering the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard by blocking Russian cargo to the islands after Russia threatened retaliatory measures. 

“Norway does not violate the Svalbard Treaty,” foreign minister Anniken Huitfeldt told AFP.

“Norway does not try to put obstacles in the way of supplies” to a Russian coal mining settlement in the area, she said, after Russia’s foreign ministry said it had summoned Norway’s charge d’affaires over the issue.

Moscow accused Norway of disrupting the work of the Russian consulate general on Spitsbergen, the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago. Norway has sovereignty over Svalbard but allows citizens of more than 40 countries to exploit the islands’ potentially vast resources on an equal footing.

READ MORE: Moscow threatens reprisals after accusing Norway of blocking transit to Svalbard

21 flights cancelled on Thursday

A total of 21 flights were cancelled on Thursday- 16 from SAS and five from Widerøe, an overview from newspaper VG shows. 

16 flights from SAS and two from Widerøe were due to go abroad, while the other departures were domestic. 

The cancellations are primarily due to a shortage of employees and several staff being off sick. 

“In addition, we have received a number of sick notices. This means that we do not have the opportunity to complete the flights,” Tina Szczyrbak, press officer for SAS, said. 

READ MORE: What are your rights if flights are delayed or cancelled?

Norway to take fewer Ukrainian refugees from Moldova

The Norwegian government initially pledged to bring 2,500 Ukrainian refugees to the country but will now only take 500. 

“The scope of transfers so far means that the forecast and ambition are downgraded to 500 refugees. There has been lower interest in coming here than first thought,” Wenche Fone from the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) told newspaper Klassekampen. 

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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Authorities mull euthanising a famous walrus, a 'dramatic' new climate report, and a salmonella outbreak are among the headlines from Norway on Friday.

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Authorities say Freya the walrus may be euthanised

Norwegian authorities are considering putting down a walrus that won hearts basking in the sun of the Oslofjord amid fears it is putting itself and the public in danger, they said Thursday. 

Despite repeated appeals to the public to keep their distance from the walrus — a young female weighing 600 kilos (1,300 pounds) that has been nicknamed Freya -the mammal continues to attract big crowds, the Fisheries Directorate said in a statement.

 Its text was accompanied by a photograph of a group of onlookers crowding near the animal.

 “The public’s reckless behaviour and failure to follow authorities’ recommendations could put lives in danger”, a spokeswoman for the fisheries agency, Nadia Jdaini, said.

“We are now exploring other measures, and euthanasia may be a real alternative”, she added.

The Arctic is heating up much faster than expected

Temperatures in the Arctic have risen four times faster than the rest of the planet, with the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard warming up even quicker, a new study has found. 

The environment minister Espen Barthe Eide has called the study’s findings dramatic. 

“These are dramatic figures. The study is another serious warning about how quickly climate change is happening,” Eide told Norwegian newswire NTB. 

“The ice is melting at record speed, the water is getting warmer, the permafrost is thawing, life on land as well as in the sea is changing,” he said. 

“Parts of Svalbard are in the process of changing from an Arctic to an Atlantic climate,” he added. 

The study concluded the temperature in the Arctic has increased by 0.75 degrees Celsius per decade, and this is almost four times as fast as the rest of the globe. In the areas around Svalbard and Novaya Semlja, the temperature has increased by as much as 1.25 degrees per decade. 

Salmonella outbreak linked to watermelon

An outbreak of salmonella has been linked to a batch of watermelon, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has said. 

The authority said it was working to identify the watermelons linked to the outbreak, in which 18 people have neem infected, but said it was unlikely that the batch in question was unlikely to be found in supermarkets anymore. 

Ukrainian refugees didn’t receive money they were entitled to from the UDI

A number of Ukrainian refugees did not receive the basic benefits they were entitled to when they first arrived in the country, with the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) working to identify who may be owed money. 

“We cannot say anything about when we will start the repayments themselves, but UDI wants to make it clear that this is a high-priority matter and that there are many people working on the matter,” press adviser at the UDI, Per-Jan Brekke, told the newspaper Aftenposten

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