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HEALTH

How Norway’s health insurance scheme works and the common problems foreigners face

Learning about Norway's National Health Insurance Scheme is essential. So here's a look at some common problems foreigners in Norway come up against and how to avoid them.

How Norway's health insurance scheme works and the common problems foreigners face
Here's how to avoid common problems with the National Health Insurance Scheme. Photo by National Cancer Institute on Unsplash

Norway’s National Health Insurance Scheme

The word ‘free’ is used loosely when it comes to describing healthcare in the Scandinavian country. Norway’s healthcare system is financed through national and municipal taxes. So residents are supporting their ‘free’ services through tax. Truly free health insurance is only offered to those under 16 years of age who do not pay taxes to Norway. 

Access to Norway’s healthcare and social services is not determined by whether you are a Norwegian citizen, nor whether you are registered in the National Population Register or pay taxes in Norway. It is based on residence or employment. But before you settle in and assume you’re covered from day one, there are some provisions.

  • To be considered a resident of Norway, you must have plans to live in the country for at least twelve months.
  • Membership with Norway’s National Health Insurance Scheme is only available for those who are in the country legally.
  • If you are planning on staying in Norway for less than twelve months, are not working, but have strong ties to the country, then you may be entitled to voluntary membership of Norway’s National Health Insurance Scheme.

If you are legally living in Norway but plan on studying or working abroad for a period of time, look here to see your healthcare membership eligibility while outside the country. 

And the common problems foreigners need to overcome?

  • Signing up 

According to the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), you will be automatically enrolled in the Norwegian National Health Insurance Scheme if you are legally working or living in Norway.

Processing times can range from a few days to a month, and you will usually receive confirmation through the post when you have been added to the system.

Healthcare is a large part of the Norwegian National Health Insurance Scheme, as are social services such as welfare. If you need economic support, you can apply for assistance if you are legally living in the country. How much you will receive depends on your situation and application processing times vary between each individual evaluation and municipality. 

READ MORE: Seven things foreigners in Norway should know about the healthcare system 

There are many rules and guidelines if you decide to apply for economic assistance. To see what procedures, information, and advice you are entitled to, look here.

Self-employed workers are also entitled to the same benefits as traditional employees in Norway. Though it is up to them to register events like sick leave on their own. 

  • Somethings are not free

The healthcare system in Norway is of a high standard and covers most expenses. Because it is so comprehensive, many new to the country assume that all health matters are covered by national health insurance. It is important to remember that vision and dental insurance are not a part of the public health care plan. 

Dental treatment is free for those between one and 18 years of age. If you are 19 or 20 years old, you must pay 25 percent of the total bill. If you are 21 or older, then you are required to foot the bill. 

However, there are exemptions for special cases. You can find out more about the payment exceptions here.

Eye exams, contact lenses, and glasses are not covered by public health insurance. These are normally services offered by private companies such as Spec Savers and Brilleland.

In addition to vision and dental, cosmetic surgeries are also not covered by public health insurance. 

Here is a price list for common services in Norway.

What is a frikort?

frikort or an “exemption card” is a card given out once you have reached the maximum limit of fees the public is required to pay per calendar year. In 2021, the maximum amount in fees you are expected to pay is 2,460 kroner before being eligible for a frikort

  • Many things have gone digital 

Many newcomers to Norway are surprised to find how digitalised health services in the country are. After you have become a member of the national insurance scheme, you can go online to order prescriptions, find available appointments with your GP, have digital communication with their doctor, and look at summaries of past medical appointments. 

For an overview of all the services and information, you can use online, look here.

  • Finding your GP

While your acceptance into the National Health Insurance Scheme may be automatic, it is up to you to choose your GP. 

There are a few guidelines to be aware of if you, for some reason, want to change from your original choice. You are allowed to change your GP up to two times in one year. You can also choose to switch if you officially change your address or if your GP cuts their patient list. You can find a list of general practitioners at legelisten.no.

  • The waiting times

As previously stated, the standard of health care in Norway is high, and you can visit your GP or a specialist as often as you need them. But it is not uncommon to have to wait a few weeks before you find an available appointment. The same goes for non-critical surgeries. It is not unusual to wait up to six months for a non-life-threatening yet necessary surgery.

Useful Vocabulary

egenandel – deductible

fastlege – general practitioner 

optiker – optometrist 

tannlege – dentist 

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For members

HEALTH

HEALTH: How to switch GPs in Norway 

For whatever reason, you may wish to change your GP, or 'fastlege'. Luckily, you are allowed to do this- but there are still some rules you should know about.

HEALTH: How to switch GPs in Norway 

The overwhelming majority of people in Norway are entitled to a GP, and if you are reading this, you likely have one already. 

For those without a doctor, you will need to be enrolled in the National Insurance Scheme and have a national identity number. 

However, you won’t automatically be assigned a GP, and you’ll have to register with a GP yourself. 

READ MORE: How to register with a doctor in Norway

When are you allowed to change doctors? 

If, for whatever reason, you want to change your doctor, say you don’t gel with them, find it hard to get an appointment or have heard great things about another GP, then you can change your fastlege

The Norwegian GP system allows for decent flexibility, and you are allowed to change your doctor up to two times in one calendar year, for whatever reason you wish. 

You can also change your GP if your address in the national population register changes or your current doctor leaves the surgery or cuts their patient list. 

How to change doctors 

To switch doctors, you will need to head to Norway’s digital health portal, helsenorge, and log in. You will need an electronic ID such as Commfides, BankID or Buypass ID to sign in. 

Once signed up, you can select the county you are in and see a list of doctors in your local area. The list will have the doctor’s name, age and gender, and if a substitute is covering them. 

The new doctor you choose doesn’t have to be in the same municipality as your address. For example, if you live in an area with not many appointments available, you could select a doctor in the next kommune if convenient for you. 

When you change GPs in Norway, you’ll need to ensure your new doctor has access to your medical records. It is your responsibility to do this, and much like signing up for a new GP, this isn’t done automatically. 

Having your medical records sent over to your new doctor simply involves contacting your former GP surgery and asking them to forward your record to your current practice. Your medical records also contain information from when something has been followed up, for example, notes from a scan or specialist.  

If you move homes within Norway and decide to relocate back to the municipality you were living in, you can be re-enrolled with your original GP if you return within three years of moving away. 

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