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How many family immigration permits did Norway issue in 2023?

Frazer Norwell
Frazer Norwell - [email protected]
How many family immigration permits did Norway issue in 2023?
More than 15,000 people moved to Norway to be with family last year. Pictured is a family out for a hike in Norway. Photo by Juliane Liebermann on Unsplash

More than 15,000 people moved to Norway last year to be with family or were granted a residence permit for family reunification, according to the latest figures.

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Figures from the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) have revealed how many people moved to Norway to be with family in 2023.

When moving for family reasons, applicants must either apply for a family immigration permit or register as moving to be with family under the EEA Freedom of Movement rules.

Family immigration permits are granted to those with a relative or partner in Norway who is a Nordic citizen, holds a work permit or has asylum in Norway.

The applicants are either the partner or spouse, child or parent, sibling, or, in some cases, another relative of someone living in Norway.

These permits are typically issued to those outside the EEA (EU countries plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway). Last year, the UDI granted 11,466 of these permits.

READ ALSO: The rules for moving to Norway to be with a partner in 2024

Nationals from India (1,287), Syria (1,218), Pakistan (799), The Philippines (604) and Eritrea (544) were the groups to have the most permits granted.

US citizens were the next largest group, with 452 being granted permits to move to Norway to be with family. Some 381 Brits were given a family immigration permit in 2023.

The two most common reasons people moved to be with family were to be with a Norwegian citizen or because the person they were moving to be with had a work permit in Norway. There were also many applicants to join someone who held a permanent residence permit or had asylum in Norway.

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Meanwhile, 4,457 nationals moved to Norway to be with family under the EEA rules. Just under a third of these were poles. Those from Lithuania were the next largest group, with 498 registrations. After that, those from Romania, Germany and Latvia were the next largest groups to come to Norway to be with family.

A move motivated by family ties was the third most common reason for those from the EEA to relocate to Norway after moving to study and coming to the country to work.

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