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Residency permits For Members

UPDATED: How much it costs to apply for residency and citizenship in Norway

Frazer Norwell
Frazer Norwell - [email protected]
UPDATED: How much it costs to apply for residency and citizenship in Norway
The cost of applying for a Norwegian residence or citizenship permit can be quite steep. Pictured is a stamped passport.Photo by ConvertKit on Unsplash

Whether you’ve got your eyes on a move or trip to Norway or really feel like settling down routes by cementing the long-term right to live in Norway via permanent residence and citizenship – you’ll likely want to know how much it will set you back.

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Not everyone has to pay

Before diving into the cost of the different application types, it’s worth pointing out that not everyone is expected to pay.

For starters, EU/EEA nationals can move to Norway under the Freedom of Movement rules. This means they simply need to register with the authorities and meet other criteria. This doesn’t involve a fee.

Furthermore, non-EEA family members and partners of EU/EEA nationals can move to the country under the Freedom of Movement rules, so they also don’t pay fees.

First-time asylum applicants also aren’t required to pay a fee either. Those who are renewing a permit for an asylum seeker are also exempt.

Children under 18 are exempt from paying application fees for residence and citizenship. Children are also exempt from paying a visitor visa fee if they are younger than 6.

Should you need to appeal any decisions, the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) does not charge fees for appealed decisions. Free legal assistance may also be available in some instances.

Family immigration

Norway’s family immigration residence permit typically applies to those moving to the country to be with a long-term partner, fiancé or spouse. Applications are also granted to parents and children, these rules are stricter, though. In rare cases, family immigration visas may be granted to other family members.

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The first-time application fee for adults is 11,900 kroner. Adults applying to join a refugee with a temporary residence permit pay a slightly lower price of 7,800 kroner.

Renewing a residence permit before it expires costs 4,400 kroner. A renewal after expiration will cost 11,900 kroner.

A parent visiting a child in Norway for up to nine months will have to pay 11,900 kroner. Adults who already have a family immigration permit with their fiancé and have subsequently married will need to pay 2,600 kroner for a new permit.

Those required to hand in their application at a visa application centre may need to pay an additional service fee.

Work and studies

An application for a residence permit for work costs 6,300 kroner. Those coming to Norway to study must fork out 5,400 kroner to complete their application. Researchers coming to Norway with their own funding pay the same fees as students.

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The cost of renewing these permits is the same as a first-time application. Meanwhile, Au pairs need to pay an application fee of 9,300 kroner.

Visitor visas

A visa for visitors aged over 12 will cost 80 euros. This covers single and multiple entries. The visitor visa for children aged between 6 and 12 costs 40 euros. Citizens of Azerbaijan and The Gambia pay slightly different fees to other applicants.

Permanent residence and citizenship

Applying for permanent residence seems cheap compared to the other residence types. Although, by the time you are ready to apply for permanent residence, you will likely have spent north of 10,000 kroner on residence applications. The cost of a permanent residence permit is 4,000 kroner.

Citizenship costs 6,500 kroner, or 2,700 kroner for Nordic nationals and 3,200 kroner for those who have previously given up their Norwegian citizenship.

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