GP shortage in Norway much larger than previous estimates indicate

Frazer Norwell
Frazer Norwell - [email protected] • 1 Sep, 2022 Updated Thu 1 Sep 2022 12:03 CEST
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The number of those without a GP in Norway is much higher than previous estimates, according to a new report. Pictured is a doctor using a laptop. Photo by National Cancer Institute on Unsplash

The number of those in Norway without a GP is much higher than previous estimates from the Norwegian Directorate of Health suggest, according to a new survey among doctors.

As many as 235,000 in Norway lack a GP, a number far higher than previous estimates from the Norwegian Directorate of Health, according to a report from broadcaster TV2

Previous figures from the Norwegian Directorate of Health had the number of those without a doctor at around 175,000. 

“The GP crisis is now completely out of control. Today, every 24th citizen in Norway lacks a GP,” Nils Kristian Klev, head of the Association for General Practitioners, told TV2

The figures reported by TV2 come from a survey carried out by the GP association that more than 75 percent of general practitioners in the country responded to.

In a previous survey run by The Local, foreign residents in Norway highlighted that trouble getting an appointment or not being assigned a GP was one of their biggest criticisms of the Norwegian healthcare system, which they rated favourably overall. 

READ MORE: What do foreigners think of the Norwegian healthcare system?

“The GP crisis is very real, and therefore the government has promised that we will come up with powerful measures in the 2023 budget,” Minister of Health Ingvild Kjerkol said of the survey’s results to TV2. 

Norway’s government announced an expert committee review into the current GP system to tackle a ‘crisis’ within the current model in August.

The objective of the expert committee will be to provide specific recommendations on how the GP system can be improved so that all residents have a permanent GP, in addition to finding a sustainable model, the government said in August. 

One flaw with the current system in the eyes of the medical association is the high number of people on GP’s patient lists. 

“The GPs must have fewer patients on their lists in order for there to be livable working conditions. It will also lead to fewer doctors wanting to quit and more newly qualified doctors wanting to work as GPs,” Klev said. 

To cut down the number of patients on GP’s lists, Klev says the government would need to stump around 2.3 billion kroner to try and recruit around 1,000 new GPs. 

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Frazer Norwell 2022/09/01 12:03

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