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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Why food will be more expensive from today, a key strike deadline and a heavy rain warning for east Norway are among the main stories from Norway on Friday.

Pictured is Barcode in Oslo
Read about why food is becoming more expensive, a weather warning and a strike deadline in today's roundup. Pictured is Barcode in Oslo. Photo by Natalie Chapman on Unsplash

Food to be more expensive from today 

The price of food in Norway will be “noticeably” higher from today, with the annual shopping bill for families expected to rise by a few thousand kroner from July 1st. 

The reason is that July 1st is one of two days each year when supermarkets raise prices for many different food products. 

Food will become expensive for several reasons. Firstly, as part of the agricultural settlement this year, farmers are allowed to charge more for their grain, meat and dairy products, and fruit and vegetables. 

Suppliers to supermarkets have also raised their prices, and it has become more expensive for food to be imported to Norway. 

“There is no doubt that there will be price increases, noticeable price increases,” Bård Gultvedt, director of business policy and government contact in Norgesgruppen, which owns Kiwi and Meny, said. 

Oslo shooting: Police appeal for video evidence

Oslo police, which is investigating the shooting in Oslo that left two dead and 21 injured last weekend, has appealed for the public to submit more video evidence if it has any. 

So far, Oslo police have received more than 70 tips from the public. They have also asked that video recordings from CCTV and the like from before the attack be stored for eight weeks rather than the typical seven days. 

“We are now working primarily with what we call the video project,” police attorney Børge Enoksen said at a press conference. 

READ ALSO: Norwegian police to remain armed with advice to postpone Pride events dropped

Mediation deadline for potential SAS pilot strike 

The extended mediation deadline for SAS and pilots working for the airline to reach an agreement and avoid a strike is midnight, July 2nd. 

If the two parties cannot agree, nearly 900 pilots will go on strike, with 400 being in Norway. 

A strike would lead to many of SAS’s flights from Norway over the weekend being cancelled. Previously, VG has reported that a strike would ground around 140 flights. 

READ ALSO: What a potential SAS pilot strike means for travellers in Norway

Heavy rain warning

A yellow danger warning is in place for heavy rain in Eastern Norway on Friday. 

“Heavy rain showers are expected in the eastern region. There are large local variations in intensity and quantity, and the weather can change quickly. The location of the precipitation is uncertain. Locally, the precipitation is expected to pass 15 millimetres per hour,” meteorologists forecasted.

Rain is also expected in north Norway. 

“Heavy rain can cause locally difficult driving conditions due to surface water and danger of aquaplaning. Adjust the speed according to the conditions and have a safe and good trip,” the State Highways Authority tweeted. 

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For members

TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Authorities mull euthanising a famous walrus, a 'dramatic' new climate report, and a salmonella outbreak are among the headlines from Norway on Friday.

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Authorities say Freya the walrus may be euthanised

Norwegian authorities are considering putting down a walrus that won hearts basking in the sun of the Oslofjord amid fears it is putting itself and the public in danger, they said Thursday. 

Despite repeated appeals to the public to keep their distance from the walrus — a young female weighing 600 kilos (1,300 pounds) that has been nicknamed Freya -the mammal continues to attract big crowds, the Fisheries Directorate said in a statement.

 Its text was accompanied by a photograph of a group of onlookers crowding near the animal.

 “The public’s reckless behaviour and failure to follow authorities’ recommendations could put lives in danger”, a spokeswoman for the fisheries agency, Nadia Jdaini, said.

“We are now exploring other measures, and euthanasia may be a real alternative”, she added.

The Arctic is heating up much faster than expected

Temperatures in the Arctic have risen four times faster than the rest of the planet, with the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard warming up even quicker, a new study has found. 

The environment minister Espen Barthe Eide has called the study’s findings dramatic. 

“These are dramatic figures. The study is another serious warning about how quickly climate change is happening,” Eide told Norwegian newswire NTB. 

“The ice is melting at record speed, the water is getting warmer, the permafrost is thawing, life on land as well as in the sea is changing,” he said. 

“Parts of Svalbard are in the process of changing from an Arctic to an Atlantic climate,” he added. 

The study concluded the temperature in the Arctic has increased by 0.75 degrees Celsius per decade, and this is almost four times as fast as the rest of the globe. In the areas around Svalbard and Novaya Semlja, the temperature has increased by as much as 1.25 degrees per decade. 

Salmonella outbreak linked to watermelon

An outbreak of salmonella has been linked to a batch of watermelon, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has said. 

The authority said it was working to identify the watermelons linked to the outbreak, in which 18 people have neem infected, but said it was unlikely that the batch in question was unlikely to be found in supermarkets anymore. 

Ukrainian refugees didn’t receive money they were entitled to from the UDI

A number of Ukrainian refugees did not receive the basic benefits they were entitled to when they first arrived in the country, with the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) working to identify who may be owed money. 

“We cannot say anything about when we will start the repayments themselves, but UDI wants to make it clear that this is a high-priority matter and that there are many people working on the matter,” press adviser at the UDI, Per-Jan Brekke, told the newspaper Aftenposten

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