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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Thursday

Wolf population management and the second day of the Bergen International Festival, are among the main stories from Norway on this Thursday Ascension Day.

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Thursday
A photo of a wolf in Järvsö, Sweden, where the government want to cull some of the animals to bring down the wolf population, in a plan that could see cooperation with Norway on its wolf management. Photo: Robert Larsson, Unsplash

Ascension Day

This public holiday in Norway today is tied to a Christian holiday celebrating Jesus’s ascent to heaven. Expect store closures and busy roads as people hurry to holiday homes.  

Sweden to seek cooperation with Norway on wolf management

Sweden’s government has announced that it will allow a major wolf cull this year, with hunters licensed to kill as many as half of the estimated 400 animals in the country.

The decision means that “the government should investigate the possibilities for cooperation with Norway on the management of the Scandinavian wolf population as the population is in both countries”, according to rovdyr.org.

On Wednesday, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency was commissioned to investigate in more detail what is required to bring the wolf population down to the level decided by the Swedish government – between 170 and 270 individuals.

There are currently 480 wolves living in an estimated 40 packs between Sweden and Norway, with the vast majority — about 400 — in central Sweden. 

Queen attends opening of the Festival Exhibition in Bergen

The Bergen International Festival opened on Wednesday, which this year celebrates 70 years.

On Thursday, the Festival Exhibition 2022 opens in Bergen Kunstshall. The exhibition is one of Norway’s most important contemporary art exhibitions, and Queen Sonja will be present at the opening.

Bergen’s annual cultural and music festival is the largest festival in the Nordic countries of its type and runs for 14 days across the city. 

Norwegian’s Casper Ruud plays the second round of Roland-Garros

On Thursday morning Rudd will play in the second round match against the Finn, Emil Ruusuvuori after winning the opening round against the French veteran Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Tuesday.

In two previous meetings, Ruud has beaten Ruusuvuori in straight sets. Rudd, who is from Snarøya in Norway is ranked number 8 in the world.

Drink-driving limits

And if you missed this article yesterday, we compare which countries in Europe have the strictest drink-drive limits.

Certain countries around Europe have stricter policies than others regarding drinking and driving and harsher punishments for those caught exceeding legal limits. 

While the safest thing to do of course, is to drink no alcohol at all before driving it is useful to know what the limit is in the country you are driving in whether as a tourist or as someone who frequently crosses European borders by car for work.

In Norway, the limit for standard drivers is 0.2g/l. It could take a woman with average weight one standard drink, or one can of beer, to reach that level. Penalties in Norway can start at a one month salary fine and a criminal record. 

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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Why food will be more expensive from today, a key strike deadline and a heavy rain warning for east Norway are among the main stories from Norway on Friday.

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Food to be more expensive from today 

The price of food in Norway will be “noticeably” higher from today, with the annual shopping bill for families expected to rise by a few thousand kroner from July 1st. 

The reason is that July 1st is one of two days each year when supermarkets raise prices for many different food products. 

Food will become expensive for several reasons. Firstly, as part of the agricultural settlement this year, farmers are allowed to charge more for their grain, meat and dairy products, and fruit and vegetables. 

Suppliers to supermarkets have also raised their prices, and it has become more expensive for food to be imported to Norway. 

“There is no doubt that there will be price increases, noticeable price increases,” Bård Gultvedt, director of business policy and government contact in Norgesgruppen, which owns Kiwi and Meny, said. 

Oslo shooting: Police appeal for video evidence

Oslo police, which is investigating the shooting in Oslo that left two dead and 21 injured last weekend, has appealed for the public to submit more video evidence if it has any. 

So far, Oslo police have received more than 70 tips from the public. They have also asked that video recordings from CCTV and the like from before the attack be stored for eight weeks rather than the typical seven days. 

“We are now working primarily with what we call the video project,” police attorney Børge Enoksen said at a press conference. 

READ ALSO: Norwegian police to remain armed with advice to postpone Pride events dropped

Mediation deadline for potential SAS pilot strike 

The extended mediation deadline for SAS and pilots working for the airline to reach an agreement and avoid a strike is midnight, July 2nd. 

If the two parties cannot agree, nearly 900 pilots will go on strike, with 400 being in Norway. 

A strike would lead to many of SAS’s flights from Norway over the weekend being cancelled. Previously, VG has reported that a strike would ground around 140 flights. 

READ ALSO: What a potential SAS pilot strike means for travellers in Norway

Heavy rain warning

A yellow danger warning is in place for heavy rain in Eastern Norway on Friday. 

“Heavy rain showers are expected in the eastern region. There are large local variations in intensity and quantity, and the weather can change quickly. The location of the precipitation is uncertain. Locally, the precipitation is expected to pass 15 millimetres per hour,” meteorologists forecasted.

Rain is also expected in north Norway. 

“Heavy rain can cause locally difficult driving conditions due to surface water and danger of aquaplaning. Adjust the speed according to the conditions and have a safe and good trip,” the State Highways Authority tweeted. 

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