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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Monday 

Fatal traffic accidents, a Covid cash row and projects facing postponements are among the main stories from Norway on Monday. 

A lakeside cabin in Norway.
Read about a Covid cash row, several deaths on Norwegian roads and more in today's roundup of important news. Photo by Maarten Zuidhoorn on Unsplash.

Several dead after traffic accidents

Four people died, and two were flown to hospital following an accident in the Steigen tunnel, Nordland, north Norway, on Sunday afternoon.

 Another two died in an accident in Voss earlier on Sunday. Four people involved in the collision were sent to hospital. 

“We are at full speed into the season where there are usually more fatal accidents than in other periods of the year,” Cecilie Bryner from Trygg Trafikk, which promotes safe driving, said to newswire NTB. 

37 people have lost their lives on Norwegian roads so far this year. Last year, 87 died in accidents. 

Deadline for agricultural settlement

The deadline for the state and agricultural sector to agree on subsidies and funding is today. 

The farmers demand 11.5 billion kroner from the government, while the state has only offered 10.15 billion. 

The two parties have remained tight-lipped on how close they are to a possible agreement or what’s being negotiated.

This year’s settlement is considered far more complicated than during a typical year. The agreement is supposed to cover farmers’ incomes for 2023 and cover the cost of soaring prices and inflation in 2022, agricultural paper Nationen writes. 

Norway’s municipalities in Covid cash row 

A row has erupted between the government and Norwegian municipalities as funding promised to help cover the bill for Covid to local authorities was not included in the revised national budget for 2022, public broadcaster NRK reports

Several municipalities have hit out at the government as a result. 

Norway’s Minister of Local Government, Sigbjørn Gjelsvik, defended the budget and said there wasn’t a cash flow problem in Norwegian municipalities and that things should “happen in the right order”. 

This opens the door for compensation to be agreed upon after a report on Covid expenditure is published in September. 

READ MORE: What the revised national budget in Norway means for foreigners

Road projects could be pushed back 

Transport Minister Jon-Ivar Nygård has said that less money will be spent on road construction next year and that large national projects could be put on hold or scaled back. 

“We will need to review our priorities because there will probably be less money than planned for transport,” Nygård told newspaper VG

The minister didn’t say which projects were most likely to be put on the backburner, but it was most likely those that were still in the planning and preparation stages.

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TODAY IN NORWAY

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Why food will be more expensive from today, a key strike deadline and a heavy rain warning for east Norway are among the main stories from Norway on Friday.

Today in Norway: A roundup of the latest news on Friday 

Food to be more expensive from today 

The price of food in Norway will be “noticeably” higher from today, with the annual shopping bill for families expected to rise by a few thousand kroner from July 1st. 

The reason is that July 1st is one of two days each year when supermarkets raise prices for many different food products. 

Food will become expensive for several reasons. Firstly, as part of the agricultural settlement this year, farmers are allowed to charge more for their grain, meat and dairy products, and fruit and vegetables. 

Suppliers to supermarkets have also raised their prices, and it has become more expensive for food to be imported to Norway. 

“There is no doubt that there will be price increases, noticeable price increases,” Bård Gultvedt, director of business policy and government contact in Norgesgruppen, which owns Kiwi and Meny, said. 

Oslo shooting: Police appeal for video evidence

Oslo police, which is investigating the shooting in Oslo that left two dead and 21 injured last weekend, has appealed for the public to submit more video evidence if it has any. 

So far, Oslo police have received more than 70 tips from the public. They have also asked that video recordings from CCTV and the like from before the attack be stored for eight weeks rather than the typical seven days. 

“We are now working primarily with what we call the video project,” police attorney Børge Enoksen said at a press conference. 

READ ALSO: Norwegian police to remain armed with advice to postpone Pride events dropped

Mediation deadline for potential SAS pilot strike 

The extended mediation deadline for SAS and pilots working for the airline to reach an agreement and avoid a strike is midnight, July 2nd. 

If the two parties cannot agree, nearly 900 pilots will go on strike, with 400 being in Norway. 

A strike would lead to many of SAS’s flights from Norway over the weekend being cancelled. Previously, VG has reported that a strike would ground around 140 flights. 

READ ALSO: What a potential SAS pilot strike means for travellers in Norway

Heavy rain warning

A yellow danger warning is in place for heavy rain in Eastern Norway on Friday. 

“Heavy rain showers are expected in the eastern region. There are large local variations in intensity and quantity, and the weather can change quickly. The location of the precipitation is uncertain. Locally, the precipitation is expected to pass 15 millimetres per hour,” meteorologists forecasted.

Rain is also expected in north Norway. 

“Heavy rain can cause locally difficult driving conditions due to surface water and danger of aquaplaning. Adjust the speed according to the conditions and have a safe and good trip,” the State Highways Authority tweeted. 

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