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EXPLAINED: How owning an electric car in Norway could change

More and more motorists in Norway are ditching the petrol pumps and going all-electric. However, several changes could be introduced, which would significantly affect the cost and the practicality of owning an electric car.

Pictured is an electric car being charged.
Several changes could be on the way which affected electric car owners. Pictured: An electric car being charged. Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

More than half of all new cars sold in Norway are electric vehicles, and recently the government has introduced or announced several proposals which affect EV owners. 

Unfortunately, most changes put forward by the government will make it more expensive to own an EV. However, they have said they will look into one thing which would make owning an electric car much more straightforward. 

READ MORE: What you need to know about owning an electric car in Norway

Government to consider scrapping toll road and tax discounts

Toll deductions for electric cars could be reduced or scrapped as the country’s transport ministry is concerned public transport ministry is losing out to low-emission vehicles. 

A law previously passed by parliament holds that electric cars should never incur more than 50 percent of the tax applied to petrol and diesel equivalents.

But reduced public transport revenues related to higher electric car use, as well as lower intakes from tolls around Oslo because the rate paid by electric cars is lower, are causing the government to rethink, NRK reports.

“It’s great that people use electric cars. But we are not well served by people getting into their cars and drive into busy city areas instead of walking, bicycling or taking public transport,” Nygård said. 

READ MORE: Why owning an electric car in Norway could become more expensive

Re-registration fee introduced

At the beginning of May, it became more expensive for used EVs to change hands. Every time a used electric car is sold, a re-registration fee of up to 1,670 kroner will need to be paid. 

The cost will depend on the car’s age, with the fee being cheaper for older EVs. The re-registration charge is also 75 percent cheaper for electric vehicles than regular ones. 

The government hasn’t explicitly outlined whether this discount could be reduced in the future. 

Tolls in Oslo to go up

Various outlets report that the cost of driving within Oslo’s toll roads will go up twice, once in September 2022 and then again in January 2024. 

The toll hike was agreed upon as part of the third Oslo package. Oslo City Council and Akershus County Council must officially approve the agreement. 

If discounts on tolls are axed or decreased, electric car owners will be hit even more by the increases. 

VAT on electric cars could be announced in the revised budget for 2022

MVA or VAT could be introduced when the government presents its revised national budget for 2022 in mid-May, experts have predicted. 

The government proposed introducing a VAT on electric cars that cost more than 600,000 kroner when it was formed last October. VAT on vehicles is calculated based on several factors

The introduction of VAT didn’t come in the new year as expected, but now industry experts are anticipating its announcement in the revised budget.  

The Norwegian Automobile Federation (NAF) has told online publication Nettavisen that it expected VAT to be introduced eventually. 

Charging could become simpler

The government will look into making charging easier by making sure a universal payment method is adopted, Transport Minister Jon-Ivar Nygård has told newspaper VG

Currently, you cannot use one universal payment method, app or card to pay for all fast chargers in Norway. 

“It looks like it is necessary,” Nygård said of a standard payment method for charging to VG. 

The transport minister added that a solution wouldn’t be introduced until next year at the earliest. This autumn, the government will present a new strategy for electric car charging. 

Tesla to allow other models to use the Supercharger charging network

Tesla has launched a pilot project which opens its Supercharger network to non-Tesla vehicles. 

58 stations are open to non-Tesla cards, with plans to open more stations and charging posts to other vehicles in the future. 

Owners of non-Tesla vehicles pay more than Tesla owners for charging. However, the cost is still on par with other charging stations, technology news site Tek.no reports. 

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DRIVING

EXPLAINED: How to bring a foreign car to Norway  

If you've thought about bringing a car from another country to Norway, you've probably wondered what costs and paperwork would be involved. 

EXPLAINED: How to bring a foreign car to Norway  

Whether it’s a beloved classic that’s been the pride of your garage for years, a project that isn’t quite finished, or the family car for pottering around town, there are many reasons why you’d want to bring a vehicle to Norway. 

But what kind of paperwork is involved, and is it financially feasible? Let’s find out. 

Import taxes 

Before you begin the importing, you will need to contact the Norwegian Public Roads Administration (Statens Vegvesen) to see if your vehicle meets the technical requirements to be imported into Norway. 

You will also need to check with the authorities of the country you are bringing the car from to check whether there are any export restrictions or whether any clearance to move the vehicle to another country is required. 

The vehicle will need valid number plates and insurance to be driven to and in Norway. And finally, you can check whether you are due a valid added tax refund on the vehicle when it leaves the country. 

Once the car crosses the Norwegian border, you will need to go to a crossing that is manned and head to the red zone, where you can declare the vehicle. If the tax authorities in the country you are travelling from have not issued a transit declaration, you can get one at the crossing. The transit document allows goods to pass through certain areas. 

You can also pay the VAT, more on that later, that may be required at the customs office at the border, but you will need to let the customs office you will be passing through know in advance, according to the Norwegian Tax Administration.

If you don’t do it when you first pass through, you will need to arrange to go to a customs office within one to three days to pay VAT on the vehicle. You will need to go to the crossing listed on the transit declaration. In addition to VAT, you will need to pay greenhouse gas taxes. If you don’t do this within the deadline, the tax authorities will charge additional fees. 

READ ALSO: What happens if you are caught driving without a valid licence in Norway?

The transit declaration, invoice or purchase contract for the vehicle and original registration document will need to be presented to have the car cleared through customs. 

If you have not purchased the car recently, you can bring an updated valuation from the country the vehicle was bought in. You will also need an original foreign registration document. 

Once the car has been cleared with customs, you’ll receive the Notification of calculation duties and registration or, Melding til avgiftsberegning og registrering (Form NA-0221). This paperwork is only available in Norwegian, and you’ll need to present it to the Norwegian Public Roads Administration. You will also need to keep it in the car while driving with foreign plates. 

You can use a tax calculator to figure out how much it will cost to import your car. Cars over 20 years old are exempt from import taxes. However, unlike cars over 30 years old, you will still need to pay regular taxes and insurance.  

You will be able to drive with foreign number plates for up to 30 days after the vehicle has been cleared with customs. After that, you will need to have valid plates, proper vehicle registration, and insurance. 

If you don’t have all of this, the vehicle can only be used with valid temporary number plates. These are referred to as day test plates or prøveskilt. You can read more about obtaining test plates here

Getting the car on the road

Paying the taxes is not the end of the process. You will need to get the car approved for Norwegian roads. Used vehicles need to be checked over by the Norwegian Public Roads Administration Driver and Vehicle Licensing Offices. When new cars are imported, the information from the COC will be used. 

Getting the car approved requires you to book an appointment with the roads and traffic authority. You can book appointments here.

Once approved, a one-off fee will need to be paid before registering the vehicle. The one-off tax is calculated on the vehicle’s tax group, weight, CO2 emissions and engine power.

After this, the car can be registered with the public road authority. To register the vehicle, you will need the foreign vehicle card, the registration card you received when the car was cleared with customs and your own credentials, such as a passport or driving licence. You will need to have insured the vehicle too

You will get a temporary registration certificate for the vehicle when all this is done, while the full registration certificate is sent in the post. The temporary one can’t be used to drive abroad. 

If you haven’t already, you will need to hand over your foreign number plates to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office. Norwegian plates will not be issued until you do this. 

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