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OSLO

Five great things you can do for free in Oslo during spring 2022

The days are getting longer, and the temperature is rising. Here are our picks on making the most of Oslo for free this spring. 

Vigeland park
Here are our picks on the top free things to do in Oslo this spring. Pictured is Vigeland Park. Photo by Nick Night on Unsplash

Free admission to the Munch Museum (on certain days)

Whether you loathe or love the new Munch Museum’s design, it has certainly made a splash since it opened late last year. 

If you haven’t gotten round to seeing it yet and are potentially on the fence, then may want to know how to visit the museum for free. 

The museum, which contains the works of Edvard Munch, who bequeathed his works to the city of Oslo when he died, is running an offer until June, where there is free admission every Wednesday from 6pm until 9pm.

The offer is available on both the Norwegian and English versions of the website. You can book here

May 17th parades 

For the first time in three years, Norway will have typical May 17th, or Constitution Day, celebrations. This comes after previous celebrations have been curtailed and cancelled due the pandemic. 

This is a must-do activity if you’ve not been a part of non-pandemic disrupted celebrations in Norway before. 

Kids and marching bands will take part in parades, and large swathes of the population will be adorned in their national costumes. 

Forest walks and hikes

Later in the spring, the last of the snow will melt, and the cross-country tracks will give way to hiking trails. 

There are so many places in and around Oslo that make a perfect place for a spring walk.

Songsvann, and with good reason, is one of the city’s most popular nature spots. To get there, you will need to hop on the number 5 line of the Oslo T-bane and get off at the last stop, named after the lake. 

A lap around the lake is a brisk 3.2-kilometre walk. If you want a longer walk, you can continue on the far side out to the Ullevalseter hiking centre.

Sculpture parks

Vigeland Park is one of the Norwegian capital’s most famous attractions. Home to over 200 sculptures by Gustav Vigeland, designer of the Nobel Peace Prize medal and the famous Angry Boy statue, Vigelandsparken is an essential destination all year round.

However, it isn’t the only park where you can take a stroll while admiring some sculptures. 

Ekeberg Sculpture Park, close to downtown Oslo, is another park with international-renowned works, such as Venus Milo aux Tiroirs by Salvadore Dali. 

Then there’s also the Princess Ingrid Alexandra Sculpture Park in the Royal Palace gardens. 

Free attractions

The spring weather in Norway can be hit and miss. Therefore, it’s always handy to have an indoor and outdoor option when making plans. 

If the sun is shining, why not take a trip down to Akershus Fortress. The castle grounds are a popular recreational area and offer great views of the city and Oslofjord. 

There is also a free visitor centre where you can learn about the castle’s history.

If spring showers are in the forecast, then you can always pay a visit to another staple of the Oslo skyline, the town hall. 

Oslo City Hall is open to the public, and the inside is home to plenty of paintings and frescos. The main hall is also used for Nobel Peace Prize festivities.  

The museum is open 9am to 6pm daily, except Saturdays. 

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OSLO

Best things to do in Oslo in summer 2022 

Whether it's new attractions, the best nature spots, or budget-friendly travel hacks, these are some of the best things that tourists and locals can do in the Norwegian capital of Oslo this summer.

Best things to do in Oslo in summer 2022 

Oslo has something for everyone, and, arguably, summer is the best time to experience the city. 

We’ve put together a list of the best activities, attractions and things to do this year, regardless of whether you are a local, just visiting, outdoorsy or prefer the walls of a museum. 

The list includes plenty of budget-friendly hacks, meaning they won’t break the bank either. 

New national museum opens  

In June, the doors to Norway’s new national museum will open to the public for the first time. Norway’s new national museum will be the combination of four other museums, including the old National Gallery. 

The museum, which hosts some of Norway’s most iconic artworks, including Edvard Munch’s “The Scream”, will become the largest museum in the Nordics when it opens. 

The museum is located in Aker Brygge, west Oslo, just a small trot from the palace and town hall. The museum will open on June 11th. You can read more about the museum here

Island hopping 

Staying in Aker Brygge for our next pick, a popular activity among the locals in the summer is to go island hopping in the island fjord. 

Once on the islands, there are plenty of opportunities for walking, swimming and picnics. This won’t break the bank either, as you can use the public transport Ruter app to the islands. While on the ferry, you’ll have a pretty good view too. So for around 70 kroner (two 1 hour singles), you can have an afternoon spent in the sun amongst the residents of Oslo rather than being crammed onto a tour boat. 

READ MORE: How tourists in Oslo can save money and live like a local

Go on a hammock trip 

Given Norway’s abundance of nature, its only fair camping would pop up. But there’s no need for all the faff of messing about with tents. 

Oslo’s residents agree, and hammocks are more common in the capital. There are plenty of great spots for a hammock trip in the capital. 

Most of them you can take public transport too, and even more, you can combine with other activities such as swimming, hiking and biking. 

READ MORE: Five great places to go on a hammock trip in Oslo this summer

Palace reopens

The Royal Palace will open its door to the public from June 25th. The castle will be open until mid-August. The castle is open for guided tours only. The tours will travel through iconic rooms such as the Council Chamber, where King meets the government, and the Great Dining Room. 

This summer marks the first time the palace will have been open to the public for two years, after closing due to the pandemic.

Tours this year will focus on the White Lounge, which has been freshly restored. Tickets start from 175 kroner. You can click here for more information

Take a dip

From central locations, a stone’s throw from the city centre to secluded lakes, or in the river that runs through the city’s centre, there are plenty of locations to take a dip in Oslo. 

Summers in Norway can be pretty warm, and with the long days going for a swim makes perfect sense. 

The overwhelming majority of spots are open to the public, and there are even a few small sandy beaches, such as Katten badenstrand. 

READ MORE: The six best places to swim outdoors in Oslo this summer 

Picnic and engagnsgrill in the park

There are plenty of fantastic parks in Oslo, and a lot of them are major attractions too. 

Vigeland Park is one of the Norwegian capital’s most famous attractions. Home to over 200 sculptures by Gustav Vigeland, designer of the Nobel Peace Prize medal and the famous Angry Boy statue, Vigelandsparken is an essential destination.

However, it isn’t the only park where you can take a stroll while admiring some sculptures. 

Ekeberg Sculpture Park, close to downtown Oslo, is another park with international-renowned works, such as Venus Milo aux Tiroirs by Salvadore Dali. 

Add to that the fact that you can have a disposable grill, engangsgrill, or picnic in the park, too, and that’s an added bonus. 

READ MORE: What are the rules and culture of park life in Norway?

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