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What Covid-19 rules apply when going out in Norway?

Oslo, Norway.
These are the Covid rules if you are planning on going out this weekend. Pictured is Oslo, Norway during the evening. Photo by Ben Garratt on Unsplash
Norway's government recently tweaked its Covid-19 rules and lifted the alcohol ban introduced at the end of last year, meaning changes to restrictions apply when going out.

The government has eased Norway’s national Covid rules, and the ban on alcohol being sold in bars, restaurants and other licensed venues has been lifted.

Other changes include an increase to the capacity allowed at venues and a relaxation of quarantine rules for close contacts of those who test positive for the virus.

READ ALSO: Norway lifts alcohol ban as Covid rules eased

Bar’s restaurants and cafes

The country’s alcohol ban has been lifted, meaning licensed businesses can serve customers alcohol.

Venues will be allowed to serve alcohol until 11pm, and a table service requirement is in place, meaning customers can’t order at the bar.

Additionally, restaurants, bars, cafes, and other licensed premises must take customers’ contact details for infection tracking purposes.

Customers will need to wear face masks and maintain a social distance of one metre from those they don’t live with. Face masks aren’t required while seated.  

A maximum of 30 people are allowed to gather at a private event in a public place or on rented premises, such as a table booking.

Museums, shops and theatres

Museums, libraries, shops and shopping centres can stay open but are required by the government to be run in a way compatible with the current restrictions and recommendations. This means that they may opt to have capacity limits. Face masks are mandatory in these settings. Amusement parks, arcades and indoor play areas are all closed.

Indoor public events, such as theatre shows, have a capacity of 200 people when fixed designated seating is in place, or 30 when there are no assigned seats. Unfortunately, this means many of the larger theatres in the country have chosen to close their doors.

Public transport 

If you plan on using public transport to get to your plans, you’ll need to be aware of the rules. These haven’t been changed recently, but the public is asked to avoid public transport during bust periods where possible.

Travellers must wear a face mask if they can’t maintain a social distance of one metre. Masks are also require in taxis and ride-sharing services.

What happens if I or someone I’m with tests positive? 

If you test positive for Covid-19, the isolation period will be a minimum of six days but will not end until you have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without using fever-reducing medicine.

If you live with somebody or your partner has tested positive for the virus, you will need to isolate before testing on day seven. If the test returns negative, then isolation ends. 

Other close contacts of people who test positive for the virus are no longer required to quarantine. Instead, they are asked to take a Covid-19 test on days three and five after being identified as a close contact and to keep an eye out for symptoms for ten days.

READ MORE: What are the current rules for Covid-19 self-isolation in Norway?


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