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NORWEGIAN WORD OF THE DAY

Norwegian expression of the day: Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær

Is it minus 20 out? Not a problem. Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær.

Norwegian expression of the day: Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær
If you ever get caught in the cold or rain we're certain a Norwegian will be on hand to say this to you. Photo by Annie Spratt/Unsplash/Nicolas Raymond

Why do I need to know this?

Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær is as much of a mentality in the Norwegian society as it is a popular expression. Norwegians refuse to use bad weather as an excuse to not be outside and enjoy nature.

If they did, then you might not see many of them for months on end. 

What does it mean?  

Directly translated to English, Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær means, “there is no such thing as poor weather, just inappropriate clothes”. 

Norwegians in general are pragmatic and active individuals. And you can see this in what they wear throughout the four seasons. For many locals, fashion choices and clothing trends are deeply rooted in being protected and prepared for harsh weather conditions. Even in the more trendy areas of bigger urban cities. Thick soled boots trump high heels. You likely won’t catch a glimpse of a bare shoulder for months during the winter. Because thick woolen sweaters are the popular and practical choice. 

How do I use this expression? 

The expression is often stated during the winter. But you can also use it in reference to choosing the right item of gear or clothing for an outside activity like hiking or fishing. It’s a reminder to dress in layers and to bring an extra pair of dry socks. 

You will often hear the popular expression, det finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær as a response to someone who is skeptical spending time outside. 

It’s also a declaration you would say to yourself or those in your vicinity as you peer through a window caked in frost. It’s a reminder that being prepared is key. And if you want to enjoy all the breathtaking beauty Norway has to offer, wearing the appropriate clothing for the weather and the days plan is a great way to start. 

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NORWEGIAN WORD OF THE DAY

Norwegian expression of the day: Knute på tråden

When there’s an issue between two people, there may be a “knot on the rope”. 

Norwegian expression of the day: Knute på tråden

What does it mean? 

Knute på tråden means a ‘knot on the rope’. The expression is an idiom which describes a problem between two people. 

It’s used to say that two people share a strained relationship or aren’t on speaking terms rather than referring to a specific issue. 

For example, you’d use it to notice that two people aren’t getting on rather than to specify exactly what is happening between the pair. 

The term isn’t just used for romantic relationships but also between family members and friends too. 

If you are at a function and know two people not speaking or trying to avoid one another, then you would be able to describe them as having a not between them. 

This isn’t the only term involving knots in Norway. There is also hogge knuten over, which means to deal with an issue in an efficient or ruthless (sometimes reckless manner). It means to cut the knot off, eliminating it entirely. 

A similar saying in English may be “to pull the bandaid right off”. 

Use it like this:

Linde nekter å reise hjem til jul, det er en knute i tråden mellom henne og hennes lillesøster

(Linde refuses to travel home for Christmas. There is a knot in the thread between her and her little sister.)

 La du merke til at det er en knute i tråden mellom Jonas og faren hans?

(Did you notice that there is a knot in the thread between Jonas and his father?).

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