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NORWEGIAN WORD OF THE DAY

Norwegian expression of the day: Ta det med en klype salt

If someone is trying to tell you the world is coming to an end, ta det med en klype salt.

Norwegian expression of the day: Ta det med en klype salt
Photo: Annie Spratt/Unsplash/Nicolas Raymond

Why do I need to know this?

Some Norwegian expressions have the same meaning as the English versions. However, other’s don’t translate as easily.

Have you ever heard someone say ta det med en klype salt? You may struggle to find out what is true. 

What does it mean? 

When directly translated, ta det med en klype salt means, “take it with a pinch of salt”.  Luckily for those familiar with the English language, the expression means the same in Norwegian as it does in English. 

Taking it with a pinch or a grain of salt means to not take a story or piece of information you are hearing too seriously. A healthy dose of salt, or skepticism, should be used in some cases. 

Ta det med en klype salt may mean the same in English, but its origin is ancient. There are two potential explanations.

The first explanation goes that the expression stems from food being easier to swallow with a helping of salt, or adding your own interpretation to what you are given (or being told).

Other sources show the idiom comes from the fact that swallowing salt can be effective against swallowing some poisons.

Simply put, ta det med en klype salt means to not take everything someone says too literally or seriously. 

Use it like this

Ta det jeg sier med en klype salt og le av det. – Take what I say with a pinch of salt and laugh about it.

Ikke bli provosert over hva han sier. Vi må ta det med en klype salt – Don’t be disturbed by what he says. We need to take it with a pinch of salt. 

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NORWEGIAN WORD OF THE DAY

Norwegian expression of the day: Grevens tid 

Is it a good thing, or a bad thing, if you manage to do something in the "counts time"? Let's find out. 

Norwegian expression of the day: Grevens tid 

What does it mean? 

As mentioned in the intro, “grevens tid” literally translates to the “count’s time”. The count’s time means arriving at a good or lucky moment or achieving or preventing something, typically at the last minute. 

Catch a vase just before it hits the ground, or make it to the station just in time to catch your train? Then you did it in the count’s time. 

The term is said to have originated in Sweden and refers to Count Per Brahe Dy, who became governor of Finland in 1637. It was customary for a count to arrive late to events during the period. This is because, typically, the highest status one held, the more likely they were to come later. 

However, these days the saying isn’t used to describe when someone arrives “fashionably late” to use an English expression. 

Use it like this: 

Nå kom du i grevens tid 

(You came just at the right time.)

Du kom i grevens tid, jeg skulle akkurat til å ringe!

(You came just at the right time, I was just about to call you!)

Nå kom du i grevens tid! Vi skulle akkurat til å spise! 

(You came just at the right time, we are about to eat!)

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