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Mobile-first MBAs? The top international executives making a radical choice

Studying for an MBA is a major commitment, especially if you're a busy professional. But a pioneering new business school is taking a radical approach to higher education; one that offers you financial savings, a new level of flexibility, and a global network in the palm of your hand. It has also proven to accelerate its students' career progress.

Mobile-first MBAs? The top international executives making a radical choice
Photo: Katja Smith

Quantic School of Business and Technology is the world’s first accredited mobile-first business school. Its MBA and Executive MBA (EMBA) allow students, most of whom continue working full-time during their studies, to learn from any device, anywhere, anytime.

It’s what attracts senior decision-makers such as Luciano Bottoni, of Capgemini Engineering, and high-level managers who are working parents like Katja Smith, of Google. 

Students like Luciano and Katja can access a global network of savvy decision-makers (both classmates and alumni), while an innovative tuition model has resulted in one in three having earned their degree for free. Luciano’s employer covered the cost of his tuition fees because it was the right investment for the company and for him. “I think the price is the right one,” he says.

Ready to learn and grow? Apply for the app-based MBA or Executive MBA program by 23 September

Goodbye passive learning

Many online educational tools rely on traditional lecture-based learning and video presentations by professors. If you feel this isn’t what you need to boost your career in the 2020s, you’re not alone. 

Interactive app-based learning with Quantic is different. You’ll be prompted to engage with the material about every eight seconds, plus you’ll get instant feedback to help you learn from any mistakes you make.

“You can’t just passively look at it because it will not go to the next page,” says Luciano, an Italian who works as a Business Division Director at Capgemini Engineering in Germany. Before the pandemic, he would take advantage of Quantic’s mobile-first platform to study on a train while commuting. “For my kind of life and work, it’s really perfect,” he says.


Katja Smith & Luciano Bottoni (Photos: Supplied)

Making top class connections

Whether you study the MBA or the Executive MBA (which includes advanced courses designed for mid-career professionals and entrepreneurs), your classmates for the next 13 months will come from every industry.

Many studied at top universities such as Harvard, Cambridge, and Oxford, and work for leading companies such as Apple, Amazon, and Google. More than 150 Google managers have enrolled in Quantic, including mother-of-two Katja, an industry manager based in Berlin.

Katja, part of the EMBA class of August 2021, says she’s been surprised to find so many of her Quantic peers on LinkedIn working at great companies. “I’m definitely going to make use of the network,” she adds.

The EMBA attracts many people working in STEM, social sciences, and the tech industry. You can easily connect with current students and alumni (across almost 150 countries) within the app through filtering searches by industry or interests.

The extensive network allows students to collaborate with faculty and classmates, attend exclusive conferences around the world, participate in in-person and virtual meet-ups, and gives students access to research advisors and résumé consultants. Some Quantic students have even gone on to start companies together. 

Can you see yourself as an innovator of the future? Enrol in the MBA or Executive MBA that you can complete anywhere, from your smartphone, by September 23

Cutting students’ costs 

Both Luciano and Katja say the EMBA is providing clear benefits for themselves and their employers. Luciano, an engineer who is now a senior executive, says it helps him with strategic decisions involving both economics and people. For Katja, the breadth of the EMBA has given her a “different perspective” on her employer’s business that goes far beyond her client-facing role.

So what about the cost? Tuition for both the MBA and the EMBA is just US$9,600 and Quantic is continuing to invest in more ways to lower costs to students, with a larger mission of democratizing elite higher education. This tuition innovation is thanks both to companies funding the costs for their employees, as well as a tuition model that sees students’ costs offset as companies pay to recruit from Quantic’s career network.

Have you got business dreams that you want to make a reality? Quantic is the smartphone MBA and Executive MBA that goes wherever you are

Watch the video below for more insights from Luciano and Katja

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EDUCATION

Norwegian women with Indian heritage smash national average to become doctors

One in every five women in Norway with Indian heritage becomes a doctor, according to a report in the Scandinavian country.

Norwegian women with Indian heritage smash national average to become doctors
Photo: photographee.eu/Depositphotos

The high proportion of the demographic taking the medical career path is in part due to the influence of their parents, according to a report by national broadcaster NRK.

“The medical profession is highly respected in India. You hear that from your parents, and you are influenced by that,” Doctor Archana Sharma, whose parents moved to Norway from India, told NRK.

The high status of the medical profession in India influences career choices in Norway, the broadcaster writes.

The Institute for Social Research in Oslo has found that, for Norwegian women between the ages of 26 and 35 and with Indian heritage, almost one in five have completed medical studies.

By comparison, only one in 100 women with Norwegian-born parents in the same age group become doctors, according to the study, which was reported by newspaper Utrop.

“Many people experience very strong expectations that they will go into higher education, preferably within the type of high-status professions which provide security and good pay,” sociologist and project manager for the study Arnfinn Midtbøen told NRK.

“This shows that the migration [of the women’s parents, ed.] was successful,” Midtbøen also said.

An Oslo medicine student told NRK that her parents valued higher education without pressuring her.

“They have encouraged me here and throughout my childhood, but I felt no pressure to choose medicine. I think it is very common in Indian families that parents encourage children from an early stage to go into higher education,” Anisha Sharma told the broadcaster.

READ ALSO: How Norway's schools compare to other countries in global ranking

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