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LIFE IN NORWAY

Eight stories from Norway you might have missed this year

In 2019, The Local has reported on the news you need from Norway, as well as guides and features putting the spotlight on life in the Nordic nation.

Eight stories from Norway you might have missed this year
Photo: anyaberkut/Depositphotos

Here's a look back at a few of the stories you may have missed and which are worth a read before we enter the new year.

Life in Norway

It’s important for us to see life in Norway through the eyes of its foreign residents. That means asking for your views on key topical issues and aspects of life in Norway, as well as sharing the personal stories of people who have moved to Norway for work, life or love.

News

While reporting on the key daily domestic news stories, we also try to provide insight and explanation when those stories might impact foreign nationals in Norway. One such instance of this in 2019 was the controversy surrounding the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration, NAV.

Vikings

Norway often produces interesting Viking-related stories, whether related to history or entertainment. Here are two from this year.

Citizenship

Nationalization has proven to be a key issue for our readers. We’ve reported in 2019 on rule changes relevant to those who are settled in Norway and for whom citizenship is a logical future step. It’s a topic we’ll continue to cover as closely as we can in 2020.

Thank you for reading The Local this year. We hope you will stay with us as 2019 turns into 2020 and beyond. Please get in touch if you have any thoughts or questions. 

Godt nyttår

Mike, editor, The Local Norway

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HEALTH

How much does going to the dentist cost in Norway? 

A trip to the dentist can be painful in more ways than one, especially for your bank account, so how much will it set you back in Norway and how do you get an appointment?

How much does going to the dentist cost in Norway? 
Many dread a trip to the dentist. Photo by Yusuf Belek on Unsplash

Is dental work free in Norway?

Norway’s robust and comprehensive public healthcare system is accessible through the Norwegian National Health Insurance Scheme. Because it is so comprehensive, many make the assumption that all health issues, including dental problems, are covered by the scheme.  

Unfortunately, this isn’t the case as, generally, dental care is not covered by the public healthcare system. Instead, you will have to go to a private practitioner should you have an issue with your teeth or if it’s time for a checkup. 

If you’d like to learn more about what is covered by the National Health Insurance, you can look at our guide on how the scheme works and common problems foreigners run into here.

How much does it cost?

The bad news is that, much like most other things in Norway, a trip to the dentists will set you back a fair amount, and unlike the Norwegian National Health Insurance Scheme, there is no exemption card, or frikort, after you have paid a certain amount. 

READ MORE: Seven things foreigners in Norway should know about the health system

On the bright side, dental treatment is free for children under 18, and if you are aged between 19 and 20, you will only need to stump up 25 percent of the total bill. 

In most cases, everyone over the age of 21 will be expected to pay the whole bill, apart from a few exceptions, which you can read about here

The cost of dentistry can be reimbursed or subsidised if you meet any of the 15 conditions that will entitle you to claim support from The Norwegian Health Economics Administration or Helfo.

Helfo is responsible for making payments from the National Insurance Scheme to healthcare providers and reimbursing individuals for vital healthcare services not covered by the insurance scheme. 

The list of conditions includes essential work, such as having an oral tumour removed, for example. You can take a look at the 15 conditions for which you claim help from Helfo here.

You can also apply to the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV) for financial assistance relating to dental work.

How much you are eligible to receive from NAV will depend entirely on your situation. 

Below you can take a look at the rough cost of some common dental work in Norway. 

  • Examination/appointment- 600 kroner 
  • Examination/appointment with tartar removal and x rays- 1,000 kroner 
  • Small filling- 900 kroner 
  • Medium sized filling 1,400- kroner 
  • Large filling- 1,500 kroner 
  • Tooth surgically removed- 2,000 kroner 
  • Root canal filling 3,800 kroner
  • Crown- 7,000 kroner

How to book an appointment

Booking an appointment in Norway is as simple as contacting your nearest dentist. Before you book, you can typically check the price list of the dentist you will be visiting to get a rough idea of how much the visit could cost you too. 

The majority of dentists in Norway will speak good English. You can also visit an entirely English speaking dentist surgery, where all the staff will speak English, in the big cities such as Oslo if you haven’t quite gotten to grips with Norwegian yet. 

You can search for a dentist using this tool which will show you your nearest dentist in the town, city or county you live in. 

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