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‘Troll’s Penis’ to be re-erected in Norway

Norwegians have come out en masse to raise nearly 20,000 euros to repair an eye-catching penis-shaped rock formation apparently knocked down by vandals, an online collection showed on Monday.

'Troll's Penis' to be re-erected in Norway
Photo: Carina Johansen/NTB Scanpix

The formation, which local guides had planned to make a tourist destination, is known as “Trollpikken”, or “The Troll's Penis” in a very conservative translation.

Hikers in southwestern Norway's Rogaland county on Saturday found the massive rock sectioned off, lying on the ground at the base of the rock face from which it had protruded.

Media accounts of the damage showed traces of drilling on the geological formation. Police have launched an inquiry into potential vandalism.


The rock formation in all its glory prior to the suspected vandalism. Photo: Ingve Aalbu/NTB scanpix

A local entrepreneur has launched an online collection to raise money to put the pieces back together.

By Monday, almost 1,000 donors had responded to the appeal entitled “The Troll's Penis Will Be Re-Erected”, raising more than 160,000 kroner (17,000 euros; $19,000).

READ ALSO: Big, bold and a bit bonkers: Norway's large-scale sculptures

MUSEUM

Norway digitally freezes national treasures and stores them in Arctic archive

Norway’s National Museum has preserved some of the country’s most treasured artefacts digitally and stored them in a former mine on Arctic archipelago Svalbard.

Norway digitally freezes national treasures and stores them in Arctic archive
Photo: Bartek Luks on Unsplash

The Arctic World Archive was originally constructed in 2017 to “protect the world’s most important cultural relics”, the National Museum said on its website.

The data preservation facility is located on the island of Spitsbergen, part of the Svalbard archipelago, not far from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault.

The National Museum has now placed its entire collection of around 400,000 items as digital copies on plastic film rolls, which are to be stored at the Longyearbyen site.

“The dry, cold and low-oxygen air gives optimal conditions for storing digital archives and the film rolls will have a lifetime of around 1,000 years in the archive,” the museum writes. Emissions emitted by the archive are low due to its low energy consumption.

Offline storage of the archives also insures them against cyber attacks, the museum said.

In addition to all data from the National Museum collection database, high-resolution digital images of works by selected artists are included in the archive.

Works to be stored include ‘The Scream’ by Edvard Munch, ‘Winter Night in the Mountains’ by Harald Sohlberg, the Baldishol Tapestry and Queen Maud’s ball dress.

“At the National Museum we have works from antiquity until today. We work with the same perspective on the future. The collection is not only ours, but also belongs to the generations after us,” National Museum director Karin Hindsbo said via the museum’s website.

“By storing a copy of the entire collection in the Arctic World Archive, we are making sure the art will be safe for many centuries,” Hindsbo added.

In addition to the Norwegian artefacts, organisations from 15 other countries are represented in the archive, including national museums in Mexico, Brazil and India; the Vatican library, Sweden’s Moderna Museet and Unicef.

READ ALSO: Norway's Arctic 'doomsday vault' stocks up on 60,000 more food seeds

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