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Norway to 'Panama Papers' names: Turn yourselves in

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Norway to 'Panama Papers' names: Turn yourselves in
The head of ØKOKRIM, Trond Eirik Schea, said "the time is now" for those who want to strike a deal. Photo: Audun Braastad / NTB scanpix
11:20 CEST+02:00
Nearly 100 Norwegian addresses can be found in the Panama Papers database that was made public on Monday and Norway authorities are encouraging those named to step forward and accept the consequences.
The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) publicly released a database of more than 360,000 people and companies that used an international law firm based in Panama to hide their assets and avoid paying taxes. 
 
 
A search for ‘Norway’ in the so-called Panama Papers database brings up 97 different Norwegian addresses.
 
Following the release of the searchable database, the Norwegian National Authority for Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crime (ØKOKRIM) encouraged Norwegians who have their money in tax havens to report themselves to the authorities. 
 
ØKOKRIM said that it is closely following media coverage of the information emerging from the leak of records and that any Norwegians who haven’t properly reported their financial information to the national authorities such contact the agency immediately. Doing so, director Trond Eirik Schea said, will result in a lighter punishment. 
 
“We will share the information we receive with tax authorities as usual. The point is this: whoever ends up facing a criminal liability will be able to receive a milder punishment than he or she would otherwise get. The time is now,” he told Aftenposten.
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