Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Czech pres asks Norway king to get kids back

Share this article

Czech pres asks Norway king to get kids back
Czech President Milos Zeman has sent a letter to the Norwegian King. Photo: Martin Juen
15:47 CEST+02:00
The president of the Czech republic has asked the King of Norway to act of behalf of a Czech mother who had her two sons taken into foster care over alleged sexual abuse charges.
The two boys, now six and ten years old, were taken into care in 2011 when one of the boys told a nursery teacher that his father had “groped inside his pyjama”.
 
No charges have been brought against the father and Norwegian police has dropped the investigation. The couple has since divorced and the mother is seeking custody of her children. The family denies that the boys were abused.
 
In his letter, Czech president Milos Zeman asks King Harald V to act on behalf of the children's mother Eva Michalakova  to have the children released from care.
 
 ”The case of Ms Michalakova resonates strongly among the Czech public and undermines long-term Czech-Norwegian relations and the hitherto flawless image of Norway in the Czech Republic," Zeman wrote in the letter that was published by Czech newspaper Blesk. "Mrs. Michalakova enjoys mass support among Czech citizens and, as a father with a family, her fate does not leave me  indifferent.” 
 
In February this year, Zeman compared the Norwegian foster care system to the Nazi Lebensborn program that was aimed at raising the birth rate of “Aryan” children in Nazi Germany.
 
Unmarried woman, who were considered genetically valuable gave birth to children that were then adopted by racially pure and healthy parents.
 
King Harald V has not responded to the request, however the Norwegian Embassy in Prague issued a statement when the case first caught the public eye in 2014, stating that the child welfare services are not influence by other state agencies and that they could not give any information regarding the case. 
 
”The Child Welfare Services are precluded from disclosing the details of and the reasons for their decision or on any other information relating to the case to the public and any person/institution not party to the case," the statement read. "This is to protect the child from having personal and/or sensitive information made public.”
 
Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The Swedish university tackling the challenges of tomorrow

Ranked among the world's best young universities in the QS Top 50 Under 50, Linköping University (LiU) uses innovative learning techniques that prepare its students to tackle the challenges of tomorrow.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement