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The fickle five: Meet the Nobel commitee

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The fickle five: Meet the Nobel commitee
Leader of the Nobel committee Thorbjørn Jagland and director of the Nobel Institute Geir Lundestad (in picture) will announce the winner of this year's Peace Prize.
10:00 CEST+02:00
Since 1901, Alfred Nobel has decreed the Peace Prize should be adjudged by a committee of five, selected by the Norwegian Parliament. This still holds true and The Local looks at who will decide one of the world's most prestigious awards.

The members of the Nobel committee are chosen by the Norwegian Parliament (Stortinget) for a six year tenure, with the possibility of re-election. Every third year respectively two and three members are elected.

The members of the Nobel Committee currently are:

Thorbjørn Jagland (born 1950). Head of the committee. Member of the committee since 2009. Represents the Labour Party. His place in the committee is up for election this year.

Kaci Kullmann Five (1951). Deputy head of the committee. Member of the committee since 2009. Represents the Conservative Party. Her place is up for election.

Berit Reiss-Andersen (1954). Member of the committee since 2012. Represents the Labour Party. Not up for election.

Inger-Marie Ytterhorn (1941). Member of the committee from 2000. Represents the Progress Party. Not up for election.

Gunnar Stålsett (1935). Regularly meeting deputy member from 2012. Represents Centre Party.

Gunnar Stålsett replaces Ågot Valle (1945), who is on sickness leave. Valle has been a member of the committee since 2009. Represents the Social Left Party. Her place in the committee is up for election this year.

The secretary of the committee is the director of the Nobel Institute, Geir Lundestad. He is not part of the Nobel committee himself. Lundestad, who has held the post since 1990 steps down from 2015 and will be replaced by Olav Njølstad.

[Source: NTB / The Nobel Institute]

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