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ARCHITECTURE

Swedes win race to build new Statoil offices

Just a year and half after its award-winning Oslo offices were completed, Norwegian state oil company Statoil has hired a Swedish architecture firm to build yet another set of stunning offices, this time in Stavanger.

Swedes win race to build new Statoil offices
E = mc² by Wingårdh's, viewed from the south. Photo: Statoil
Statoil selected Wingårdh's striking slanted, elliptical tower over rival proposals by three Norwegian firms — Helen & Hard, Snøhetta and Space Group (who teamed up with Foster + Partners). 
 
Dutch architects OMA were also in the running. 
 
Wingårdh's proposal, named “E = mc²”, won over its rivals on largely practical considerations with Statoil praising its "highly area-efficient building shape" and good economics. 
 
"In our view this project provides us with the best land utilization, best economy and the best architectural and functional solutions,” says Arne Sigve Nylund, executive vice president, Development and Production Norway (DPN), and location manager in Stavanger.
 
 
Here's what it will look like from the side: 
 

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ARCHITECTURE

Danish architect designs flagship Norwegian whale centre

Danish designer Dorte Mandrup will be the architect behind a visitors’ centre for whale spotters northern Norway.

Danish architect designs flagship Norwegian whale centre
An Orca photographed within the Norwegian Arctic Circle. File photo: Olivier MORIN / AFP

The centre, named The Whale, will be located at Andenes, 300 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle, Norwegian business media E24 and Danish newspaper Berlingske reported.

Initially launched in May 2018 at an estimated cost of around 200 million Norwegian kroner, the project is priced at up to 350 million Norwegian kroner, according to E24 and Berlingske. It is expected to be completed in 2022.

The whale centre has already attracted attention from travel publisher Lonely Planet.

According to the website of Mandrup’s archictectural firm, the building “rises as a soft hill on the rocky shore – as if a giant had lifted a thin layer of the crust of the earth and created a cavity underneath”.

Up to 70,000 people annually have been projected to visit the remote wildlife centre, which will be a combination of museum and tourist attraction.

Because of its geographical position, scenery and wildlife at Andenes makes the area a unique attraction.

That includes a midnight sun for two months from May to July, as well as the winter polar nights, when the sun doesn’t rise at all.

READ ALSO: North Norway's polar night is about to begin. Here are the facts you need to know

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