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Mother tried for drowning child live on MSN

A Norwegian woman on Monday pleaded not guilty to murdering her 22-month-old daughter at the opening of a trial where she is accused of drowning the child while following live online instructions.

Mother tried for drowning child live on MSN
Oslo District Court. Photo: Sean Hayford O'Leary/Flickr
The woman's British lover, accused of giving instructions for the murder via an online video service, also pleaded his innocence in Oslo District Court.
   
Yasmin Chaudhry, 28, and Ammaz Omer Qureshi, 35, are accused of drowning the woman's daughter from another relationship by plunging her head into a bucket of water in October 2010.
   
The murder took place, according to investigators, after the toddler interrupted the couple during an online video chat via MSN in the early hours of the morning.
   
The man, who was in London at the time, allegedly told the woman to "discipline" the child and issued instructions which led to Chaudhry plunging the child's head under water until she lost consciousness.
 
 Chaudry then called emergency services and reported the incident as an accident. The child died in hospital the following day.
   
On Monday she pleaded not guilty to first degree murder but admitted to assaulting the child. She said her lover had told her that if the child was not disciplined she would develop loose Western habits. 
 
"I had to command respect from her. If not, she would turn into a typical Norwegian woman, just asking to be raped," the woman told the court. 
 
Her lover denied any involvement in the crime.
 
In addition to the murder, the duo are accused of "regularly" torturing the girl over a six-month period — the mother allegedly received online instructions from Qureshi who also witnessed some of the abuse via the Internet.
   
During the assault the child was forced to swallow a spoon of chilli powder, was gagged with adhesive tape, given cold showers and was slapped around the face.
   
If found guilty of murder the couple face a 21-year jail sentence. Child abuse carries a six-year sentence.

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CRIME

Norwegian police to remain armed with advice to postpone Pride events dropped 

Norwegian police will continue to be armed following a mass shooting in Oslo, but the advice for Pride events nationwide to be postponed has been scrapped, the Police Directorate announced Wednesday. 

Norwegian police to remain armed with advice to postpone Pride events dropped 

Police in Norway will continue to be armed for the foreseeable future, the Norwegian Police Directorate announced yesterday. 

It was announced that police in Norway be armed following a mass shooting in Oslo, which left two dead and 21 injured last week

Yesterday, Norway’s domestic intelligence and counter-terrorism service, PST, lowered the terrorist threat level from extraordinary to high- the second-highest level. 

“The threat level in Norway has changed from extraordinary, to high, according to PST. The danger of follow-up actions or inspired attacks means that the police will continue to be temporarily armed,” the Police Directorate wrote on its website

The police said that PST had widened the threat picture from LGBT groups to other broader targets. 

“PST maintains that LGBTQI + is still included in the target picture, but also people and events that are perceived to offend Islam, religious gatherings and uniformed personnel from the police and defence,” the police said on its website. 

Police also dropped the advice that Pride and LGBT events across the country be postponed. The recommendation was implemented due to a fear of copycat attacks from PST. 

Decisions on whether it was safe for events to go ahead would be made by local authorities going forward. 

“A national recommendation to postpone Pride events expires. The police districts will themselves make risk assessments related to individual events and handling of large crowds based on the overall threat picture and local conditions,” police director Benedicte Bjørnland said. 

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