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Norway's Islamist referee convicted of hate speech

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Norway's Islamist referee convicted of hate speech
Ubaydullah Hussain (centre): Facebook
14:29 CET+01:00
A Norwegian Islamist has been found guilty of committing hate speech agains Jews in the country, and of sending threatening emails to journalists.
Ubaydullah Hussain was sentenced on Friday to 120 days in prison, although as 60 of the days are in the form of a suspended sentence and he has already served 53 days in custody, he will not have serve any additional days in prison. 
 
"I am relieved that it was not imprisonment," the 28-year-old told VG after the verdict was read. "I'm a little disappointed that I was convicted on four of five counts, but I am relieved that I was acquitted of the last." 
 
When Jewish people in Oslo demanded police protection in 2012, citing a rise in antisemitism in the country, Hussain made threatening comments on Facebook. 
 
"I will give them protection, inshallah, just as soon as I pass my hunting test and get myself an AK-47," he wrote,  according to the indictment.
 
He also sent a threatening email to Nina Johnsrud, a journalist at Dagsavisen newspaper after she wrote an article about Islamists in the country. 
 
"This article has been noted by both known and unknown brothers,"  he wrote. "and it has not been well received. That you pry into people's private lives has set minds ablaze. And you shouldn't be surprised if someone or something crops up in your private life too -- with words or actions, I don't know." 
 
"This is not a threat," he added. "Just a friendly warning." 
 
Hussain was acquitted, however, of hate speech against the Somali lesbian activist Amal Aden, who he said on Facebook should have been stoned to death for her homosexuality. 
 
On Tuesday, the Norwegian Football Association (NFF) turned down Hussain's application to resume work as a referee, arguing that his controversial statements meant that women, homosexual or Jewish players could not be assured of his impartiality.  
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