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Norwegians shun kitchen for prepacked Christmas

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Norwegians shun kitchen for prepacked Christmas
Why bother trying this at home? Ribbe served with red cabbage salad. File: AnneCN/Flickr
11:56 CET+01:00
Norwegian culinary skills at Christmas could take a back seat as more revelers choose to get their seasonal food from a box, local media reported on Friday.
Making the fad Norwegian Christmas sausage look appetizing is a hard task even for the most skilled homemaker, but that hasn't stopped food producers Fjordland from adorning its website with a picture of a pre-cooked version of the greyish fare.
 
Surely no Christmas celebration would be complete without pork mixed with a modern addition of skimmed-milk powder and a dose of preservatives?
 
While Norwegian traditionalists may be balking at the advent of pre-packed Christmas food and the additives they bring to the dinner table, the producers nonetheless expect to triple its sales this festive season. About one in fifteen Norwegians will open not only Christmas presents but a box for dinner this year, according to estimates released Friday by the food producers.
 
“We sold around 100,000 meals the first years, we estimate this will be 300,000 this year,” company spokesman Knud Einar Søyland told the Nationen newspaper.
 
The company's Facebook page, meanwhile, sports a picture of picturesquely chirpy Christmas elves giving the thumbs-up to a bowl of porridge. The company said it sold a third of its annual porridge production in the run-up to Christmas, and that the festive season saw an approximate increase of overall sales by 40 percent.
 
The food producers have even made a crack at ribbe - the traditional boneless rack of ribs with crackling served at Christmas. 
 
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