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OSLO

Missing Norway Islamist found in Pakistan jail

Arfan Bhatti, the Norwegian gangster turned Islamist, has been tracked down to a prison in Pakistan.

Missing Norway Islamist found in Pakistan jail
Arfan Bhatti demonstrating outside the US embassy Moscow - Kyrre Lien / Scanpix NTB
The 36-year-old, who was found by a reporter from Norway's TV2 channel, disappeared on January 7 2013 on a visit to Pakistan, leading to speculation he had been seized by Pakistan's intelligence services. 
 
He told TV2 he had been sentenced to six years for violating the Frontier Crime law, which governs the country's tribal areas, but that he was refusing to seek assistance from Norwegian authorities. 
 
"According to Sharia law, I can not receive help from infidels. Therefore, I have not called or sought to involve them," he told TV2. 
 
Bhatti, who has Pakistani parents, was born and brought up in Oslo, where he joined the Young Guns gang in the early 1990s.  He later became an extreme Islamist, and was jailed for his role in shots fired at an Oslo synagogue in 2006.  He is considered one of the leading figures in the extreme Islamist group Ansar Al-Islam. 
 

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OSLO

Have Oslo’s new electric scooter rules reduced accidents?

New rules were brought in to combat the sharp rise in accidents and injuries involving electric scooters in Oslo. But, one month later, have the new regulations done the job?  

Have new rules had an impact on the number of accidents involving scooters in Oslo. Pictured it two e-scooters parked outside a

New rules brought in to cut down on the number of e-scooter accidents in Norway’s capital appear to have had the desired effect as incidents were more halved in September, when the rules were introduced, compared to the month before. 

This is according to figures from Oslo University Hospital’s (OUS) emergency department that have been obtained by newspaper Aftenposten

The Emergency Medical Service in Oslo registered 143 injuries in connection with electric scooters in September. In August, the month before measures were brought in, there were 301 injuries.’

Compared to the peak of accidents in June, where 436 injuries were recorded, incidents are down by almost two-thirds. 

“We are very happy. This is what we hoped for,” Henrik Siverts, chief physician at OUS’s emergency department, told the newspaper Aftenposten

‘We feared it would happen’: Oslo sees first death of electric scooter rider

Among the new stricter rules introduced for rental scooters, which included significantly cutting the number of devices in the city, was a curfew that prevented people from using them between 11pm and 5am. 

Siverts said that the curfew had a dramatic effect in reducing accidents at night. 

“Unsurprisingly, accidents have gone down at night time. What injuries we do get at night are probably people who privately own their scooters. But accidents have also gone down during the day, too,” he explained.  

Just eight injuries were recorded in September at night, compared to just under 100 in August. 

Over the summer, a surge in accidents meant accident and emergency departments in Oslo were forced to have more staff on during weekends. Still, as a result of the reduction in scooter accidents, staffing has now returned to normal. 

Have your say

Have the new e-scooter rules in Oslo been effective? Let us know in the poll below. 

 

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