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CYCLING

Norwegian ex-cyclist Kjærgaard admits doping

Another former US Postal teammate of disgraced Lance Armstrong, Steffen Kjærgaard, on Tuesday admitted to using banned blood booster EPO when racing the Tour de France alongside the American.

Norwegian ex-cyclist Kjærgaard admits doping
Photo: Erlend Aas/NTB Scanpix

Kjærgaard said he started doping on his own initiative in 1998 when with the Danish Chicky World team, going on to meet with Belgian doctor George Mouton for "advice" to "avoid the risk of being caught".

The Norwegian then joined the US Postal team and raced alongside Armstrong in the 2000 and 2001 Tours. He said doping at the time was endemic and the team arranged all.

"Everything was organized by the team," Kjærgaard told a press conference.

"I can personally assume that there were a certain number of others involved in doping," he added.

Kjærgaard's comments follow the fall from grace of Armstrong, who has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

The International Cycling Union (UCI) on Monday gave its backing to a damning US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) dossier that placed the Texan at the heart of the biggest doping programme in sport, erasing his record back to August 1st 1998.

Eleven other former members of US Postal have previously told their stories of doping with the professional cycling team, notably Tyler Hamilton.

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CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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