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BREIVIK

Clear me or kill me: Breivik

Anders Behring Breivik told an Oslo court Wednesday there were only two possible outcomes of his trial: acquittal or the death penalty.

Clear me or kill me: Breivik
Photo: Lise Åserud/Scanpix

"There are only two legitimate outcomes of this case," he told the court: "Acquittal or the death penalty."

He acknowledged that neither was "realistic," since he has confessed to the attacks and Norway does not apply the death penalty.

If found sane, Breivik risks a 21-year jail term, which could then be extended indefinitely if he is still considered a threat to society. If found insane he could be sentenced to closed psychiatric care, possibly for life.

"I consider 21 years prison a pathetic punishment," he said, adding he thought it a shame that one of the judges hearing the case had been removed on Tuesday for having called for him to receive the death penalty the day after the July 22nd attacks.

Two psychiatric evaluations have drawn contradictory conclusions on Breivik's sanity, and ultimately it will be up to the judges to rule on them when they deliver their verdict sometime in mid-July.

Breivik, who has said his attacks were aimed at defending "ethnic Norwegians" from what he considers a Muslim invasion, also told the court two other cells were prepared to attack Norway.

When prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh asked if Norwegians should truly fear attacks from two other cells, Breivik answered: "Yes."

"I am only one of very many militant nationalists in Norway and Europe … If our demands are not met this will happen again," he said, referring to his wish that the ruling Labour Party put an end to its generous immigration policies.

On July 22nd last year, Breivik first killed eight people when he set off a bomb in a van parked outside buildings housing the offices of Labour Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, who was not present at the time.

He then travelled to Utøya island where, dressed as a police officer, he spent more than an hour methodically shooting at hundreds of people attending a ruling Labour Party youth summer camp.

The shooting spree claimed 69 lives, mostly teens trapped on the small island surrounded by icy waters. It was the deadliest massacre ever committed by a lone gunman.

Breivik has entered a plea of not guilty, saying his acts were "cruel but necessary".

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BREIVIK

Norway mosque shooter ‘has admitted the facts’: Police

A Norwegian man suspected of killing his step sister and opening fire in a mosque near Oslo last weekend, has admitted to the crimes though he has not officially entered a plea, police said on Friday.

Norway mosque shooter 'has admitted the facts': Police
Philip Manshaus appears in court on August 12. Photo: Cornelius Poppe / NTB Scanpix / AFP
Philip Manshaus, 21, was remanded in custody Monday, suspected of murder and a “terrorist act” that police say he filmed himself committing.
   
Answering police questions on Friday, “the suspect admits the facts but has not taken a formal position as to the charges,” Oslo police official Pal-Fredrik Hjort Kraby said in a statement.
   
Manshaus is suspected of murdering his 17-year-old step sister Johanne Zhangjia Ihle-Hansen, before entering the Al-Noor mosque in an affluent Oslo suburb and opening fire before he was overpowered by a 65-year-old man.
   
Just three worshippers were in the mosque at the time, and there were no serious injuries.
   
Manshaus appeared in court this week with two black eyes and scrapes and bruises to his face, neck and hands.
   
Police have said he has “extreme right views” and “xenophobic positions” and that he had filmed the mosque attack with a camera mounted on a helmet. He had initially denied the accusations.
   
The incident came amid a rise in white supremacy attacks around the world, including the recent El Paso massacre in the United States.
   
Norway witnessed one of the worst-ever attacks by a rightwing extremist in July 2011, when Anders Behring Breivik, who said he feared a “Muslim invasion”, killed 77 people in a truck bomb blast near government offices in Oslo and a shooting spree at a Labour Party youth camp on the island of Utøya.