SHARE
COPY LINK

SWEDEN

More Norwegians buying Swedish holiday homes

Lured by lower prices across the border, more and more Norwegians are snapping up summer homes in Sweden, new statistics show.

More Norwegians buying Swedish holiday homes
Photo: Karin Lindström (File)

Along with Germans, Danes and Dutch, Norwegians are among those most eager to own a slice of Swedish summer paradise.

Since 2007, Norwegian ownership of Swedish cottages has increased by nearly 35 percent, according to Statistics Sweden, and they now own around 9,000 cottages located in the land of their neighbours to the east.

This spike in interest makes Norwegians the fastest growing group of foreign summer home owners in Sweden.

“The number of holiday homes purchased by Norwegians has risen for the second year in a row, by seven percent. They are primarily coming to areas straddling the Norwegian border,” said Rein Billström of Statistics Sweden.

Last year, foreign ownership of summer houses in Sweden climbed by 2.9 percent compared to the previous year, according to figures from Statistics Sweden.

Overall, foreigners now own 35,045 Swedish summer homes and cabins, or about 6 percent of the overall stock.

Danes dominate the ranks of foreign owners of Swedish summer homes, with about 12,000 cottages now in the hands of people coming from Sweden's Scandinavian neighbour to the south.

The next largest group of foreign owners is Germans, who own around 10,000 cabins scattered throughout Sweden's vast wilderness.

The largest share of cabins owned by foreigners, 40 percent, is located in Kronoberg County in southern Sweden, and Värmland County in western Sweden, where 20 percent of foreign-owned cottages are located.

And in 20 of Sweden's 290 municipalities, at least one third of summer cottages are owned by non-Swedes with the list topped by Markaryd in southern Sweden, where 60.7 percent of the cabins are owned by foreigners.

However, Strömstad, situated by the Norwegian border in western Sweden, and Ljungby in southern Sweden have the highest actual number of foreign-owned cottages, with 1,279 and 1,174, respectively owned by non-Swedes.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

RENTING

Landlord or tenant: Who pays which costs in Norway? 

What do tenants in Norway typically need to fork out for, and which bills will the landlord cover when leasing a property? Here's what you need to know. 

Landlord or tenant: Who pays which costs in Norway? 

Norway is a nation of homeowners, with 76.4 percent of households in the country owning a home. However, just under a million people are still renting, according to the national stats agency Statistics Norway (SSB). 

The true cost of being a tenant is often considerably more than just the base rent. Other expenses such as utilities are also expected to be covered by renters. 

But when renting in Norway, who is responsible for which costs? The tenant or the landlord? 

As with most things in life, it depends, and while you will be liable for many of the costs yourself, some of them will be the landlord’s responsibility. 

READ ALSO: Eight things to know when renting an apartment in Norway

Who pays what? Which costs are tenants liable for in Norway?

To stop tenants from being hit with too many additional costs outside of the rent, the landlord must include the cost of things such as stair cleaning, porter fees, housing association costs, contents insurance, communal electricity fees (for the whole block if it is an apartment) in the overall rent price. 

The landlord can’t charge tenants for keys or to set up a deposit account either, according to rental platform husleie.no.

Outside of the rent, a landlord can charge for the tenant’s water and electricity consumption. Typically, however, the rental ad and contract outline whether electricity and water will be included. 

Electricity is rarely included, and most landlords will allow the tenant to enter an agreement with an energy provider separately from the rental agreement. 

When renting a room or living in a house share, it is more common for landlords to charge for water and electricity instead of having the tenant set up agreements themselves. 

If the landlord charges a tenant for electricity, the tenant has the right to see the meter readings. 

What about maintenance? 

Unless otherwise stated in your contract, the landlord is typically responsible for maintenance. Maintenance is considered the work to maintain the home’s standard when the tenant moved in. 

However, the tenant will have to cover some costs. These are taps, locks, power sockets, bathroom fixtures, switches and objects that aren’t fixed to the property, such as pots and pans.

Additionally, the landlord can ask the tenant to reimburse them for maintenance costs if they believe they have not used the home or furniture with sufficient care. 

Items such as cookers, washing machines, and dishwashers are the landlord’s responsibility if they belonged to them initially. Although, it’s worth pointing out that the rule about misuse or sufficient care also applies to domestic appliances.

READ MORE: How to resolve disputes with your landlord

What if the landlord renovates or makes changes to the property? 

Landlords have the right to make changes without seeking permission from the tenant, providing the work can be carried out without significant inconvenience or work that reduces the property’s value for the tenant. 

Stuff like removing walls is considered much more comprehensive than simple changes, so a tenant must approve of the most significant building work. Also, if tenants make changes to the home that improve the property, they can ask to be reimbursed at the end of the tenancy. However, the landlord must only pay to the extent they benefit from the changes financially. This means that generally, you won’t get the full cost back. 

The property owner can’t charge tenants extra for changes carried out to the home or hike the rent up. Rent can only be increased in line with the Rent Act, meaning only once a year and within inflation for those who have rented the property for a while or to bring it in line with current rental market prices for those who have lived there a while. If the contract expires and you sign a new one, the landlord can put the rent up then also. 

READ MORE: When can the landlord increase rent and by how much?

SHOW COMMENTS