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OSLO

Oslo second-richest city in the world: study

Oslo is the wealthiest metropolitan area in Europe and the second richest city in the world in terms of gross domestic product per capita, according to a Brookings Institute study.

The Norwegian capital comes in just behind Hartford, Connecticut, in the study of the 200 richest global cities.

With an average annual income of $74,057 in 2011, Oslo’s wage earners trailed their counterparts in the Connecticut state capital by just over $1,000.

That duo outpaced the chasing pack by a considerable distance: residents of third-placed San Jose earned a relatively modest $68,141, while the denizens of Abu Dhabi floundered in fourth with an average income of $63,859.

In a list dominated by cities in the United States, the only European cities to join Oslo in the top ten were Zurich (6) and Stockholm (8).

This dominance is under threat, however. The Brookings’ study found that 90 percent of the world’s fastest-growing metropolitan economies are located outside North America and Western Europe.

The poorest cities in the world, according to the study, are Cairo, Mumbai and Alexandria.

The fastest-growing metropolitan area is Shanghai, followed by Riyadh and Jiddah.

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OSLO

Have Oslo’s new electric scooter rules reduced accidents?

New rules were brought in to combat the sharp rise in accidents and injuries involving electric scooters in Oslo. But, one month later, have the new regulations done the job?  

Have new rules had an impact on the number of accidents involving scooters in Oslo. Pictured it two e-scooters parked outside a

New rules brought in to cut down on the number of e-scooter accidents in Norway’s capital appear to have had the desired effect as incidents were more halved in September, when the rules were introduced, compared to the month before. 

This is according to figures from Oslo University Hospital’s (OUS) emergency department that have been obtained by newspaper Aftenposten

The Emergency Medical Service in Oslo registered 143 injuries in connection with electric scooters in September. In August, the month before measures were brought in, there were 301 injuries.’

Compared to the peak of accidents in June, where 436 injuries were recorded, incidents are down by almost two-thirds. 

“We are very happy. This is what we hoped for,” Henrik Siverts, chief physician at OUS’s emergency department, told the newspaper Aftenposten

‘We feared it would happen’: Oslo sees first death of electric scooter rider

Among the new stricter rules introduced for rental scooters, which included significantly cutting the number of devices in the city, was a curfew that prevented people from using them between 11pm and 5am. 

Siverts said that the curfew had a dramatic effect in reducing accidents at night. 

“Unsurprisingly, accidents have gone down at night time. What injuries we do get at night are probably people who privately own their scooters. But accidents have also gone down during the day, too,” he explained.  

Just eight injuries were recorded in September at night, compared to just under 100 in August. 

Over the summer, a surge in accidents meant accident and emergency departments in Oslo were forced to have more staff on during weekends. Still, as a result of the reduction in scooter accidents, staffing has now returned to normal. 

Have your say

Have the new e-scooter rules in Oslo been effective? Let us know in the poll below. 

 

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