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Norway has Europe's priciest ski passes: study

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Norway has Europe's priciest ski passes: study
Photo: Pål Berge (File)
10:55 CET+01:00
One-day ski passes in Norway and Switzerland can be up to three times as expensive as in other European countries, a new study has shown.

The average daily rate for a ski pass in Norway and Switzerland is 324 kroner ($54) and 297 kroner ($50), respectively. In third place comes Italy, with an average price of 292 kroner, putting it above fourth-placed Sweden.

For the study, German online travel service ab-in-den-urlaub.delooked at ski pass prices at 488 resorts in Germany, Norway, Switzerland, Austria, Finland, Liechtenstein, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Sweden. Other criteria, such as the length of skiing tracks, altitude or the number of ski lifts were not taken into account.

The least expensive locations for skiing are the Czech Republic (125 kroner, $21), Slovakia (161 kroner, $27) and Germany (167 kroner, $28).

However, the average figures can be somewhat misleading, since in countries like Austria, for example, prices range from “very expensive” to “advantageous.” In Switzerland, by contrast, almost all ski resorts charge high prices, the study shows.

The average price for daily ski passes in the eight surveyed countries is 262 kroner ($44). The most expensive location is Norway's Hemsedal with a price of 380 kroner ($64).

The most wallet-friendly passes are to be found in the Swabian Alps, in southern Germany, and Erzgebirge Krusne hory, in the Czech Republic. Both cost 107 kroner per day ($18).

For weekly prices, Switzerland tops the list, with a ski pass costing an average of 1,785 kroner ($300). Here, Norway falls to fourth place with average prices of 1,535 kroner ($258), behind Italy (1,654 kroner, $278) and Austria (1,583 kroner, $266).

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