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Facebook bans Norway kid show's ovary clip

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Facebook bans Norway kid show's ovary clip
Line Jansrud drawing female internal sexual organs on the body of her assistant. Photo: Screen Grab/NRK
13:27 CEST+02:00
Facebook has deleted a clip of a Norwegian children's science presenter telling viewers about ovaries, fallopian tubes and the uterus by painting their locations on a real woman's naked skin.
Line Jansrud, the presenter of NRK's children's science show Newton, used a real woman, shown naked from the waist down. revealing her belly button, pubic hair and thighs. 
 
 
At one point in the programme, Jansrud explained menstruation with her face looking at the camera between the naked thighs of the assistant,  while bright red blood trickled down only centimetres from her head. 
 
When the show's producer Erling Normann posted the clip on Facebook on Friday, it was quickly removed by Facebook's moderators. 
 
”I don’t remember exactly what the message said, but it was about general guidelines. It was something about nudity,” he told NRK
 
Jansrud caused mild controversy in Norway in February when she took a pregnancy test live on children’s TV, revealing that she was expecting her first child.
 
”Many people thought I was acting, but it was totally real," she told Dagbladet.  "Of course it’s private, but I’m passionate about showing children how the body works and that includes pregnancy. It's the most natural thing in the world.”
 
The deleted clip was part of a series on puberty, in which Jansrud had previously covered body hair, urination and voice change. 
 
This is not the first time the Scandinavian approach to sex education and children has caused a stir. Earlier this year, a Swedish music video aired on a children’s show “Willie and Twinkle”, featuring singing penises and vaginas went viral.
 
 

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