• Norway's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Breivik won't discuss nationalist contacts

AFP · 18 Apr 2012, 11:40

Published: 18 Apr 2012 09:33 GMT+02:00
Updated: 18 Apr 2012 11:40 GMT+02:00

"I know that you will try to delegitimize me for the next two hours. We may as well skip over that and get to the conclusion," Breivik said in an outburst during questioning by prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh.

Breivik had during the first two days of his trial appeared calm and collected as he asked the court to acquit him yet making clear he would "have done it again", and readily answering questions from prosecutors and chief judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen.

But on Wednesday, he quickly grew frustrated with Engh's line of questioning over his claims that he had contacts with "militant nationalists" in Liberia and London.

In his 1,500-page manifesto published online the day of the attacks, the 33-year-old right-wing extremist said he was a member of a network of militant nationalists, the Knights Templar, that he founded with three other people in London in 2002.

Norwegian police have never been able to prove its existence.

On Wednesday, he told the court he had been in contact on the internet in 2001 with a person abroad who was instrumental in the creation of the Knights Templar.

He also said he went to Liberia to meet a militant nationalist Serb, but refused to provide his name or details about the meeting.

"I do not want to provide information that could lead to the arrest of others," he said.

As Engh asked him why militant nationalists would want to have contact with him, Breivik asked her: "May I ask what the purpose is .. of your way of reasoning?"

"You are trying to sow doubt about whether the network exists .. that is your purpose. I hope you will put less weight on ridiculing me and focus more on the issue," he said.

"I am interested in casting light on the radicalization process, but I don't want to make your delegitimisation strategy easier for you," he said.

She persisted with her line of questioning.

"I don't want to say anything about that... I don't want to say more about Liberia... I don't want to say more about it," Breivik repeated, forcing Engh to finally read from his police interrogation transcript.

The judge warned Breivik that if he continued to refuse to answer, it could be used against him.

A day earlier Breivik read a 73-minute statement to the court -- after being granted 30 minutes to speak -- outlining his Islamophobic and anti-multicultural ideology, which he says explains why his attacks were "cruel but necessary."

Story continues below…

Reading from a prepared text, Breivik said he had bombed government buildings in Oslo before shooting down 69 people -- most of them teenagers -- on the nearby Utøya island to defend "ethnic Norwegians" from rising multiculturalism, insisting he "would have done it again."

The confessed killer has claimed "legitimate defence," and rejected any criminal guilt.

On Tuesday, he told the court he had toned down his rhetoric and tried to play down his earlier antics, explaining he was intent on proving his sanity and showing his comprehensive ideology was not the rantings of a lunatic.

If found sane, Breivik risks a 21-year jail term, which could then be extended indefinitely if he is still considered a threat to society. If found insane he could be sentenced to closed psychiatric care, possibly for life.

Two psychiatric evaluations have drawn contradictory conclusions on his sanity, and ultimately it will be up to the judges to rule on them when they deliver their verdict sometime in mid-July.

Your comments about this article

Today's headlines
Norwegian ship rescues over 1,000 refugees
Kripos said that the ship had never before brought so many people on board. Photo: Kripos/Scanpix

The Norwegian rescue vessel Siem Pilot on Wednesday came to the aid of more than 1,000 people off the coast of Libya.

Shareholders at Norway's Opera accept Chinese bid
Opera's Oslo offices. Photo: Gorm Kallestad / Scanpix

Deal for the world's fight-biggest internet browser will now need US and Chinese approval.

Ryanair departure will doom Norway airport
Passengers depart a Ryanair flight at Moss Airport Rygge. Photo: Jon Olav Nesvold / NTB scanpix

The board of directors at Moss Airport Rygge will shut down the airport's commercial operations if Irish carrier Ryanair makes good on its threats to abandon its base there.

Norway teacher sexually assaulted 108 children
Police prosecutor Julie Dalsveen and state attorney Jo Christian Jordet. Photo: Terje Bendiksby / NTB scanpix

Gjøvik District Court on Tuesday sentenced a former teacher to 12 years behind bars for sexually abusing 108 children.

Norway woman killed by cow in ‘natural’ act
The cow killed the woman when she tried to help with the birthing process. Photo: Yngve Brox Guldbjørnsen / NTB scanpix

A cow who attacked an 80-year-old woman in Rødøy Municipality in Nordland over the weekend will be put down, its owner said.

Video
Kygo sets all-time Norway record on US Billboard chart
Kygo's debut album, 'Cloud Nine', will land at number 11 on the next Billboard chart. Photo: Jon Olav Nesvold / NTB scanpix

Bergen native Kyrre Gørvell-Dahll, better known as Kygo, is now the highest-ever placing Norwegian act on the Billboard 200 list.

Militants release ‘final message’ from Norwegian
Norwegian hostage Kjartan Seikkingstad and Canadian Robert Hall were forced to appeal to their governments for help. Photo: SITE Intelligence Group

Islamist extremists have released what they call a "final message" from three hostages including Norwegian Kjartan Sekkingstad.

Hillary Clinton wants to block Norwegian in US
Clinton's campaign said the candidate has urged President Obama to deny Norwegian's application. Photo: Spencer Platt/Scanpix

Likely Democratic nominee for president says "too many questions have been raised" about Norwegian's Irish subsidiary.

SAS cancels 40 flights over technical issue
Photo: Johan Nilsson/Scanpix

As of Monday morning, 17 departures and 22 arrivals at Copenhagen Airport had been cancelled, affecting departures out of Oslo and Stavanger.

Video
Norway's most spectacular road opens for summer
Although parts of the road remain closed, the scenic overlook is open. Photo: Marianne Løvland / NTB scanpix

As of Friday, parts of the Trollstigen mountain road will open for the summer – see the amazing video of how it got ready.

All 13 on board die in Norway helicopter crash
National
All 13 on board die in Norway helicopter crash
National
Norway violated mass murderer's human rights: court
Norway to allow gay church weddings
Society
Church of Norway to allow same-sex weddings
Sponsored Article
Eat, learn, live: unforgettable holidays in France
For first time, majority in Norway don’t believe in God
Society
For first time, majority in Norway don’t believe in God
Norway preps 'breakthrough' on gender change
Health
Norway preps 'breakthrough' on gender change
Breivik says he'll fight 'to the death' for Nazism
National
Breivik says he'll fight 'to the death' for Nazism
National
Memo: Norway 'not mentally prepared' for refugees' impact
Norway is the world's fourth happiest country
Society
Norway is the world's fourth happiest country
Norway moves closer to allowing dual citizenship
National
Norway moves closer to allowing dual citizenship
Politics
Norway's tough asylum plans face resistance
National
'Patriot' group Soldiers of Odin debut in Norway
National
Oslo is the real ‘Capital of Scandinavia’
Health
Norway ads use Hitler teddy bear to scare parents... about dust
National
Migrants: Norway 'sending us to death' in Russia
Norway under fire over tough new asylum plans
2,023
jobs available