• Norway's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Breivik's world view on show at Oslo court

AFP · 17 Apr 2012, 15:26

Published: 17 Apr 2012 15:26 GMT+02:00

On Tuesday, the first day of his testifying, Breivik told a court trying him for the murder of 77 people that he acted to defend ethnic Norwegians from the threat of rising multiculturalism.

"People who call me evil have misunderstood the difference between evil and brutal," he said, adding that the decision to drop the bombs on Japan was, like his carnage, also made with "good intentions."

The 33-year-old also drew parallels to Native American tribal chiefs Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, saying they were examples of those who fought for their people. "Were they terrorists ... or heros?," he asked.

Speaking in a calm and composed voice as he presented his Islamophobic and anti-immigration ideology, Breivik described Oslo as a "multicultural hell".

"Christians today are a persecuted minority," he said, while claiming that "rivers of blood caused by Muslims" are now flowing in European cities, citing Madrid, London and Toulouse, the sites of Islamist extremist attacks.

Judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen repeatedly asked him to quickly wrap up his statement after he exceeded his allotted 30 minutes.

The gunman had received permission to address the court from a prepared text, which he said he had already scaled back and toned down, but which he described as necessary to present the framework of his case and counter "the lying propaganda" presented by media.

He said he had toned down his rhetoric out of consideration for the survivors and families of the victims, but the judge several times reminded him of his pledge.

A lawyer for survivors and family members of his victims objected at one point, telling the court many objected to this methodical presentation of what Breivik termed "the facts".

Television and radio were banned from broadcasting his words live amid concern he would seek to use his court appearance to preach his ideology.

"Multiculturalism is a self-destructive ideology," Breivik claimed, expressing disdain for Norway's generous immigration policy which he said would soon make ethnic Norwegians a minority in their own country.

"All that will be left is sushi and flat screens," he said.

He often used the pronoun "we" in his speech, giving the impression he was a member of a larger group, and frequently cited statistics and studies.

"We do not accept .. that we are made into a minority in our own country," he said.

Insisting that his attacks were "preventive", he asked to be acquitted.

But at the same time he said he was not afraid of being sent to prison, saying it would be "the biggest honour".

"I was born into a prison," where the multicultural elite were conducting "indoctrination" in schools to maintain their "hateful" and "evil" ideology.

"In this prison you are not allowed to protest ... This prison is called Norway," he told the court.

He claimed that multiculturalists had all the power and there was no room for "militant nationalists" like himself to air their views peacefully.

"When peaceful revolution is made impossible, the only option is violent revolution," he claimed.

The man who grew up in the poshest part of the Norwegian capital told the court: "I was born and raised in a conflict zone," insisting that parts of Oslo had become "no-go zones for anyone but Muslims.

Story continues below…

"Aggressive cultures .. like Islam will grow .. as aggressively as cancer," he told the court.

On July 22nd, Breivik first killed eight people when he set off a bomb in a van parked in central Oslo before heading to Utøya island where, dressed as a police officer, he spent more than an hour methodically shooting at hundreds of people attending a ruling Labour Party youth summer camp, killing a further 69.

He said it had been necessary for him to attack the Labour Party and its youth wing to change the party's multicultural policies and hopefully ward off full-out war.

He compared the Labour Party's youth wing AUF to Hitler Youth, saying he targetted them on the island of Utøya because "most AUFs are naive and indoctrinated."

"These were not innocent children, but political activists," Breivik argued, as survivors and relatives of the victims shook their heads in disbelief and grew impatient for him to finish.

Breivik described his attacks as "the most spectacular operation conducted by a militant nationalist this century."

"Everything is turned on its head -- Norwegian media ... has decided that the good are the evil and the evil are the good," he lamented.

Your comments about this article

Today's headlines
All 13 on board die in Norway helicopter crash
Rescue crews reported no signs of survivors. Photo: Marit Hommedal/Scanpix

UPDATED: Eleven dead bodies have been recovered and the two remaining people are presumed dead.

Modern-day Norwegian Viking conquers Instagram
A throw-back photo before the beard and hair reached their full potential. Photo: Lasse Matberg/Instagram

Hot enough to melt snow, this apparent reincarnation of Thor has captured hearts the world over.

Norway's sovereign fund posts negative return
Yngve Slyngstad, CEO of Norges Bank Investment Management. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpix

Norway's sovereign wealth fund, the world's biggest, posted a negative return in the first quarter after being tapped by the government to balance its budget for the first time ever.

Philippine troops attack Norwegian hostage's captors
Norwegian resort manager Kjartan Sekkingstad (right) in a still from a previous video released by SITE. Photo: Screen Grab

Philippine warplanes on Thursday attacked Islamic militants holding a Norwegian and 19 other foreign hostages.

Norway vows to change child welfare practices
Minister of Children and Equality Solveig Horne has announced a series of changes to how the Norwegian Child Welfare Service operates. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / NTB scanpix

Following global protests, Norway prepares changes and reviews of the Child Welfare Service (Barnevernet).

Statoil tops expectations to stay in the black
The Statoil headquarters in Fornebu. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpix

Norwegian oil giant Statoil held up better against lower oil prices than expected.

Philippines vows military strike on Norwegian's captors
The Abu Sayyaf terrorists have killed one captive and have threatened to kill the others, including Norwegian Kjartan Sekkingstad (right). Photo: NTB Scanpix

Following the execution of a Canadian hostage, Philippine President Benigno Aquino says he will 'neutralize' the terrorists still holding a Norwegian and up to 20 others.

Norway cabin gets 'Frozen' treatment at Disney World
When Disney World visitors enter the Royal Sommerhus, they'll actually be entering a replica of this cottage at Sverresborg Trøndelag Folk Museum. Photo: Sverresborg Trøndelag Folk Museum

Kids will be able to meet Elsa and Anna in a replica of a Trondheim cottage.

Norway moves to bar entry to 'hate preachers'
Integration Minister Sylvi Listhaug. Photo: Berit Roald / NTB scanpix

The Justice Ministry wants to crack down on religious groups who invite people into the country "who undermine Norwegian values".

Breivik civil case
Norway to appeal Breivik human rights ruling
Photo: Lise Åserud / NTB scanpix

UPDATED: The Norwegian state will appeal against the Oslo District Court’s ruling that convicted terrorist Anders Behring Breivik’s prison conditions violate his human rights.

Sponsored Article
How to launch your international career
National
Norway violated mass murderer's human rights: court
Sponsored Article
What's the best way for expats to transfer money abroad?
Norway to allow gay church weddings
Society
Church of Norway to allow same-sex weddings
Norway to allow gay church weddings
Society
Church of Norway to allow same-sex weddings
For first time, majority in Norway don’t believe in God
Society
For first time, majority in Norway don’t believe in God
Norway preps 'breakthrough' on gender change
Health
Norway preps 'breakthrough' on gender change
Breivik says he'll fight 'to the death' for Nazism
National
Breivik says he'll fight 'to the death' for Nazism
National
Memo: Norway 'not mentally prepared' for refugees' impact
Sponsored Article
Retiring abroad: ensuring your health is covered
Norway is the world's fourth happiest country
Society
Norway is the world's fourth happiest country
Norway moves closer to allowing dual citizenship
National
Norway moves closer to allowing dual citizenship
Politics
Norway's tough asylum plans face resistance
Sponsored Article
Why expats choose International Health Insurance
National
'Patriot' group Soldiers of Odin debut in Norway
National
Oslo is the real ‘Capital of Scandinavia’
Health
Norway ads use Hitler teddy bear to scare parents... about dust
National
Migrants: Norway 'sending us to death' in Russia
Norway under fire over tough new asylum plans
Health
Norway doctors push plan for 'tobacco-free generation'
2,139
jobs available